上海品茶2020 Tag Archive

hothmgxz

Reader disagrees with column on Jason Whitlock statements

first_imgDear Mr. Bruce,Today I came across your most recent column that comments on Jason Whitlock and the statements he made in reference to Tony Dungy, Michael Sam, and Michael Vick(http://newpittsburghcourieronline.com/2014/07/30/inside-conditions-mummers-dance-dungy-sam-and-jason-whitlock/).Admittedly, I am a new reader of yours (this is the first of your columns that I have read), so I am not familiar with your writing style or tone. Hence, I apologize if I am misinterpreting your intent. However, I respectfully disagree with your assertions about Mr. Whitlock and his comments.I have been following Jason Whitlock as a sports journalist for a while now. In the past he has made what I believe to be outlandish and/or contrarian statements for the sake of entertainment, shock value, and stirring the pot of public discussion on sports-related topics. But I think it is a gross mis-characterization to call Mr. Whitlock a “sell-out”, “…the Clarence Thomas of Black sports journalism”, or an “…unofficial representative of the ‘Tea Party’”.Instead, I would argue that Mr. Whitlock is a Black man, in a profession that is currently and historically dominated by White males, who expresses his opinions in an unfiltered way.  I don’t think it’s fair for a Black man who is critical of the statements and/or behaviors of  Black athletes and coaches to be labeled a sell-out.In my opinion, such labels only serve to squash the diversity of opinion within the Black community.We, as Black people have fought for diversity in the sports arena, the workplace, and in the larger society. The willingness to take up this fight was not only based on the personal vested interests Black people have in their own freedom and equality, but also in an inherent understanding that a body constructed of diverse components, makes the unit stronger.A diverse workforce that includes Black workers, managers, and executives makes for a better, stronger workforce.  Clearly the diversity in sports, with the inclusion of Black athletes and coaches, makes for better sporting events.Even, at a basic biological level, it has been scientifically proven that genetic diversity makes a given population and/or a given species stronger. Yet, I regularly witness efforts to squash, condemn, and discourage the diversity of thought and opinion within our own community. Your commentary comes across as one of these efforts.Furthermore, if you look at other statements Mr. Whitlock has made about Black athletes who have transgressed, by word or deed, I think you will find many examples of Mr. Whitlock expressing thoughtful and nuanced opinions.For example, he writes a thoughtful, well-articulated piece critical of Kobe Bryant’s comments on the Trayvon Martin case (http://espn.go.com/nba/story/_/id/10704715/jason-whitlock-kobe-bryant-trayvon-martin).In addition, on Friday’s PTI (http://espn.go.com/espnradio/play?id=11293068), he condemned Ray Rice’s actions in Rice’s domestic violence case, while also stating that he appreciated the level contrition and the introspective tone of Rice’s recent press conference, calling for the public to be supportive of Rice’s effort to rehabilitate his life.In neither of these cases does Mr. Whitlock sound like someone who is anti-Black or carrying water for Fox News.Admittedly, your commentary hit close to home because, although I don’t agree with Mr. Whitlock on everything he says, many of the sentiments he expresses ring true for me or at least cause me to reconsider my position.Let’s take his stance on Tony Dungy, for example. I have the utmost respect for Tony Dungy. His conduct on the field as a player, as a coach, and as a member of the community all exemplify so many characteristics that make him an admirable human being.  On top of that, Pittsburgh is my hometown and Mr. Dungy’s connection the Steelers only adds to my admiration.However, I think the opinions he expressed about how he would handle a situation like the one involving Michael Sam were wrong — or, at the very least, misguided.  To be fair, I think the opinions of some sports writers and commentators were egregiously off base when they made both implied and direct comparisons between the sentiment of Mr. Dungy’s statements to the attitudes of Jim Crow proponents.Nevertheless, I disagree with the underlying message of Mr. Dungy’s remarks.  That doesn’t take away or diminish the respect I have for him as a man.  I simply think he is wrongheaded on this particular issue.  Does that make me a sell-out?Does expressing such an opinion in public make me Clarence Thomas? I would argue that it just makes me a man with a critical opinion. Nothing more. Nothing less. That is how I view Jason Whitlock and his opinions — even when I disagree with him. Please consider extending him, and those of us who may be like him, the same courtesy.Please note that the criticism in this letter is not intended as an attack on you. I appreciate you, as a Black man voicing his opinion and adding to the public discourse on sports-related social topics.However, I ask that you reconsider the language you use when referring to others in the community who express opinions that differ from yours. I believe that encouraging diverse thought and demonstrating mutual respect will provide our community with the strength it needs to address the many challenges we face in and out of the sports arena.Respectfully,Jason Glennlast_img read more

Read More

hothmgxz

Here’s what Cheteshwar Pujara had to say about comparisons with Rahul Dravid

first_imgAdvertisement 5ae6vmNBA Finals | Brooklyn VsqWingsuit rodeo📽Sindre E7vyg( IG: @_aubreyfisher @imraino ) qpcpWould you ever consider trying this?😱bh2r8Can your students do this? 🌚9jsRoller skating! Powered by Firework When ‘Mr. Dependable’ Rahul Dravid decided to hang up his shoes from international cricket back in 2012, the Indian dressing room was deeply concerned on how to fill the void left by the legendary batsman. But in came Cheteshwar Pujara and boy did he relieve the selectors and fans alike! The Saurashtra batsman has a solid technique, is a fantastic grafter, and while batting at No.3 he often plays the role of the anchor – something which reminds us of Dravid in his prime. So naturally, in a recent interview when asked about the comparisons between him and ‘The Wall’, Pujara respectfully denied while adding that he still has “a lot of things to achieve.”Advertisement Picture Credit: Cricket Country“It is a big honour for me but it’s not the right comparison because I still have a lot of things to achieve in my life and someone like Rahul Bhai who has played all the formats, scored more than 10,000 runs in Tests and ODIs, he’s played T20 format as well. So I still have a lot of achieving and I’m still learning. I’m at an age where I have taken a lot of guidance from him, luckily he’s always available,” Pujara said.Advertisement He then revealed how Dravid helped him during his transition from a first-class cricketer to a international batsman.“I first met him at a Ranji game and he was back then captaining the Indian team. They had visited Rajkot, when I first spoke to him he was very approachable. At that time I hadn’t played any international matches. How to transition from Ranji to the international level, that was my first conversation with him. When I got into the team I spoke to him about what should I do, he had many thoughts on how to approach international cricket.”“After that, once he retired and mentoring young kids, he was coach of India A team and I was going through a tough time, he gave me many advices. He’s such a positive person. He told me that you have that talent, you need to believe in yourself, your opportunities will come and ultimately it did come.”“Also when we are talking about the technical aspect of this game, he knows what he’s talking about. He has told me not to make a lot of changes in my game, I just have to fine-tune a few things” he concluded. You may also like:Relive some of Cheteshwar Pujara’s best moments in the whites of India on his 31st birthdayPakistani opener says Tendulkar is role model; claims to have modeled his game after him  Advertisementlast_img read more

Read More