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UTO, Episcopal Church ratify ‘historic’ agreement

first_img Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Tags Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Executive Council February 2014, Rector Pittsburgh, PA UTO, Episcopal Church ratify ‘historic’ agreement New bylaws, memo of understanding on operations meant to begin a new day Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Events Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit a Press Release Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Albany, NY United Thank Offering Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Belleville, IL Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Hopkinsville, KY By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Feb 7, 2014 Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT center_img Associate Rector Columbus, GA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Press Release Service Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Curate Diocese of Nebraska Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit a Job Listing Youth Minister Lorton, VA Featured Jobs & Calls An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Comments (1) Director of Music Morristown, NJ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Comments are closed. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Elizabeth Phillips says: Executive Council, Rector Tampa, FL Editors’ note: Story updated to add links to agreement documents.[Episcopal News Service – Linthicum Heights, Maryland] The United Thank Offering and the Episcopal Church’s Executive Council officially agreed Feb. 7 on a memorandum of understanding and a new set of bylaws for the organization that for 125 years has supported the church’s mission and ministry.The agreement is a “historic leap into a new day for the UTO,” according to a cover letter for the two documents from UTO Board President Barbara Schafer and Steve Hutchinson, chair of council’s Joint Standing Committee on Governance and Administration for Mission (GAM).The documents provide “new mission opportunities and collaborative working relationships” between the UTO and the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society’s departments and staff (the DFMS is the church’s corporate name), the letter says, and they outline a vision for UTO of “broader inclusivity of divergent populations within the church.” UTO’s activities will expand to contribute to the wider mission work of the church, Schafer and Hutchinson said.The memorandum of understanding is here and the new bylaws are available here.They acknowledge that there will be a “period of transition and learning” as the memo and the bylaws are implemented.Hutchinson told the council that the working group, the UTO board and GAM all understand that both the memo and the bylaws were created to give UTO “a suitable foundation” for the future of UTO but, that they are not perfect.“The expectation is that this will be a continuing conversation for a while,” he had earlier told ENS.In fact, council also passed a resolution calling on the working group to monitor the implementation of the bylaws and memo and recommend “refinements that will further enhance the mission work of the UTO Board and its relationship to the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society.”The bylaws outline the UTO’s mission and purpose, its responsibilities, the roles of the board’s officers and members (and the terms of their service) and other functional issues.The memo of understanding details operational aspects of how DFMS will work with the UTO and vice versa.Among the things the DFMS has agreed to do are:include the UTO in its mission-planning discussions so that it is aware of the mission department’s goals and priorities;collaborate with the UTO board in preparing annual and triennial budgets for the council’s approval;manage all of UTO’s financial affairs in conjunction with the UTO board, reporting to the board with monthly financial operating statements and quarterly investment statements;manage trust funds held in whole or in part for the UTO “in a prudent manner consistent with DFMS investment policies and in accordance with the terms of the funds;provide the board with meeting-planning services and travel logistics, as well as needed staff training;provide the board with grant-accountability information;provide communications resources and a web-based internal communication system for the board that will also allow for archiving of electronic documents;manage the archiving of non-electronic documents, memorabilia and other UTO items;provide translation services and legal services as needed;promote UTO “whenever possible”; andprovide two full-time DFMS staff members to work with the board (the memo outlines the tasks of each employee).Among the UTO’s responsibilities are:acceding to the authority of the church’s Constitution and Canons, the council’s bylaws and DFMS policies and procedures;submitting an annual report to council;having its annual grant recommendations vetted by the DFMS director of mission for compliance with that year’s council-approved grant criteria, and submitting the awards to council for approval;agreeing to consult with members of the church center’s Global Partnerships Team regarding grant applications from provinces outside the Episcopal Church;being “responsible for the UTO granting process in support of the mission initiative as established by the leadership of the Episcopal Church”; andexpanding participation, with cooperation of DFMS staff, in UTO “to represent all demographics found within the Episcopal Church.”Hutchinson said that because of the intent of the memo “there’s a new day of collaboration and consultation going on already” between the board and the DFMS staff.The agreements stem from a pledge council made at its October 2013 meeting to heal the wounds incurred during a controversial effort a few months earlier to draft a memorandum of understanding between the UTO and the DMFS, and new bylaws for the historic organization. Four UTO board members resigned in disagreement over the effort in September 2013.At the time, Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori said the effort was meant to bring UTO’s operating procedures “into compliance with both federal law and with DFMS policies.”At the time, there was also a desire to help the 125-year-old ministry evolve its fundraising process in a changing church and culture.In a resolution council passed at its October meeting, the members “committed to a season of reconciliation and renewal of all involved in a thoughtful and faithful engagement and conversation to resolve matters of governance and administration, while honoring the UTO’s historic promotion of a theology of thankfulness, so that the mission of the UTO can be strengthened.”That season began during that October meeting when four members of UTO’s board met privately with council’s governance and administration for mission committee for what Hutchinson said was a time of “candid” conversation.Shortly after the October council meeting, Jefferts Schori and UTO Board President Barbara Schafer issued a joint statement pledging to work together to overcome the controversy.A working group made up of UTO and council members was formed and met in Fort Worth, Texas in early January. Hutchinson and Schafer attended as did UTO Vice President Marcelle Cherau; UTO Secretary Dena Lee; council members Stephane Cheney, Tess Judge and Marion Luckey; and DFMS legal counsel Paul Nix. UTO Coordinator Heather Melton and Grants Convener Margaret Cooper participated via teleconference.Hutchinson told ENS that the group met together for 52 hours over four and a half days, and in the end there was “full consensus and unity” on the proposed memo of understanding and bylaws. The UTO board later unanimously approved the two documents, he said.UTO was established in 1889 as the United Offering by the Women’s Auxiliary to the Board of Missions and primarily supported the work of women missionaries. UTO later broadened its emphasis to include all areas of the church’s work.UTO grants are funded in large part with the money that Episcopalians deposit in “Blue Boxes,” which they keep in their homes and offices. Over the last 124 years UTO has granted $131,789,046.70, according to a report here.UTO suggests that people should daily pray and give – by putting some coins in their Blue Box – in recognition of their daily thanks for what God has given them. Oftentimes, the people whom the UTO calls “thankful givers” supplement their daily contributions before sending the money to UTO either individually or through a process known as diocesan in-gatherings. The UTO believes that thankful giving unites the givers spiritually with the people who benefit from their gifts.During the group’s Sept. 25-Oct. 1 board meeting, Melton said that giving to UTO has declined over the last 10 years.In 2007, the UTO made 91 grants totaling $2,401,906.70. In 2009, it granted close to $2.1 million in 63 grants. For 2013, UTO awarded 48 grants for a total of $1,517,280.91. The complete list of grants is here.Executive Council called in 2008 for a UTO study group to clarify the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society’s legal relationship with UTO.Sandra McPhee, the first chair of the group, noted at the time that there was nothing in writing that spells out the UTO’s relationship to the DFMS, despite the fact that UTO was using the tax-exempt number assigned to the DFMS by the Internal Revenue Service, which expected the DFMS to “control” the UTO.The council committee that proposed the study group also noted the UTO’s declining revenue and wondered if UTO’s fundraising model and grant-making methods needed updating.The 2008 study group reported to council and General Convention in 2012. Council approved the group’s report in 2011, including a new set of bylaws and called for a memo of understanding between UTO and the DFMS. Convention also adopted the report and the bylaws. Hutchinson said that the process did not afford an extensive review of the bylaws. For instance, he said, that council’s governance committee was not asked to review them.The Feb. 5-7 Executive Council meeting is taking place at the Maritime Institute Conference Center.Some council members are tweeting from the meeting using #ExCoun.The Executive Council carries out the programs and policies adopted by the General Convention, according to Canon I.4 (1)(a). The council is composed of 38 members, 20 of whom (four bishops, four priests or deacons and 12 lay people) are elected by General Convention and 18 (one clergy and one lay) by the nine provincial synods for six-year terms – plus the presiding bishop and the president of the House of Deputies.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA February 7, 2014 at 5:39 pm As a former member (1976-1984) of the UTO Granting Committee, a Province II and “At Large” person, I commend the diligence it has taken to reach this point. Now as I serve as the coordinator of UTO in 2 parishes – one in CA and the other in NY states, I think the greatest part of this program is the strengthening of the prayer life of the participants. The missionary outreach is the blessing. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Knoxville, TN Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MSlast_img read more

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Christian, Muslim and Jewish artists unite in prayer for the…

first_img Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Mary Jane Miller says: Featured Events Submit an Event Listing Rector Albany, NY Lois Stern says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Ecumenical & Interreligious Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Martinsville, VA Comments are closed. Submit a Job Listing Julian Malakar says: TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab October 16, 2014 at 4:19 pm I find it very difficult to accept that Creator God would mandate that the acceptance of male hierarchal edicts are the criteria to enter Heaven. Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Bath, NC Comments (5) October 17, 2014 at 10:43 pm Art, music is language for all human irrespective of religion, color, creed and nationality. Bringing all human minds together irrespective of difference of religious believe is definitely a novel approach to bring peace in the world. But it is impossible, unless all religious teaching teaches for social harmony like our Lord Jesus Christ teaches us to love our neighbor as ourselves irrespective of religion and to leave judging others to God. Tags October 18, 2014 at 2:16 pm I am an artist also who was provoked by all the Violence and the failure of our church spiritual leaders to teach us peace and tolerance, love and mercy. I spent two years on this project for peace,I give my entire support to the efforts put forth by The Rev. Paul-Gordon Chandler, each of might try an look for ways to make the world and out individual lives more peaceful. http://peacebestill.net/ see the work, peace Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit a Press Release Rector Washington, DC By Amy SowderPosted Oct 16, 2014 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Tampa, FL Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Belleville, IL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Malcolm J Blue says: Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Knoxville, TN Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET October 16, 2014 at 3:37 pm Growing up in an interfaith household, I applaud Rev. Chandler for his amazing vision of bringing people of different faiths together through the arts. His exhibition, “AMEN: A Prayer for the World” is stunning and not to be missed. The arts, both visual and performing, are indeed an integral part of religion. As an artist of multiple genres, it would be an honor for me to one day participate in a project that integrated different religious art forms, adding music and dance as well, such as a Bach chorale, accompanied by dancers performing a hakafah while waving hand-painted Arabesque scarves. Until then, I’ll be looking forward to Rev. Chandler’s Caravan Exhibit in 2015. Christian, Muslim and Jewish artists unite in prayer for the world Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Collierville, TN The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Jobs & Calls Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Press Release Service Cathedral Dean Boise, ID October 16, 2014 at 2:45 pm Interfaith relationships are great for we are to do good works to bring glory to God . To love eachother seeking to see God in eachother is good . But to enter Heaven requires the Person of Jesus Christ. This is joy to all religions because the effort to be at God’s Throne pure in heart comes from the Communion of our Lord. He is the Way, Truth and the Life. All you have to do is believe. What surprises God the most is when we love Him. Other than that He knows every past and future time of our lives. Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Rev. Paul-Gordon Chandler, president and founder of CARAVAN, an interfaith nonprofit organization that unites cultures and creeds of the West and Middle East through the arts, stands next to an art piece by Mahmoud Hamdy in the 2014 CARAVAN art exhibition, “AMEN: A Prayer for the World” at the Cathedral Church of Saint John the Divine in New York City until Nov. 23. Photo: Amy Sowder[Episcopal News Service] The Rev. Paul-Gordon Chandler grew up in Senegal, a predominately Muslim country in West Africa where his father was a minister.Throughout his childhood he observed the tension between Muslims and Christians.“I thought there has to be a better way. Most of my best friends were Muslims, and today still, Muslims number among my closest friends,” the Episcopal priest said, sitting on a wooden bench at New York’s Cathedral of St. John the Divine, the world’s largest Gothic cathedral. He answered logistics calls and texts on his cell phone while taking a break from working on the 2014 CARAVAN Exhibition of Visual Art, “AMEN: A Prayer for the World.”Open to the public until Nov. 23, the art show embodies Chandler’s lifelong mission: to ease that religious and cultural tension by focusing on commonalities rather than trying to overcome differences. With religious extremism and persecution so prevalent and interwoven so thickly with politics, especially in the Middle East, this mission is needed now more than ever, he said.Artwork by Reda Abdel Rahman, co-curator in the 2014 CARAVAN art exhibition, “AMEN: A Prayer for the World” at the Cathedral Church of Saint John the Divine in New York City until Nov. 23. Photo: Amy SowderParticipating Egyptian artist Reda Abdel Rahman co-curated the show with Chandler, founder and president of CARAVAN, an international interfaith arts nonprofit organization, with the annual CARAVAN exhibition as a flagship initiative. This year, they selected 48 artists – 30 Egyptian artists with Muslim and Christian backgrounds, and 18 Western artists with Jewish and Christian backgrounds. CARAVAN originated out of Cairo, Egypt in 2009 to build bridges between the cultures and creeds of Middle East and West through the arts.The work of 30 Egyptian artists was first unveiled in June at the Museum of Modern Art in Cairo, Egypt, and joined the work of 18 artists in the West for a joint exhibition at Washington National Cathedral, before its final stop, in New York City.This sixth annual exhibition includes Jewish artists for the first time.Chandler and Rahman chose prominent as well as emerging artists who share their mission of using art to foster unity, friendship and peace worldwide. The artists are charged with interpreting the exhibition’s theme on the sculptural form they’re given. This year, it’s the human form in prayer in poses from the Abrahamic faiths. The face on the model for the sculptural prayer form is Amun, the deity of ancient Thebes in the 11th dynasty (in 21st century BC) who is considered the first to develop religion toward monotheism.The “Amen” theme also embodies the spirit of the January 2011 Egyptian Revolution, when hordes of people from Muslim and Christian backgrounds, levels of education, economic background and ethnicity joined in solidarity against the human rights violations of the almost 30-year rule by the Hosni Mubarak-led autocratic government. After ousting Mubarak, the country’s first free parliamentary elections chose Muslim Brotherhood leader Mohamed Morsi for president. But protests against Morsi’s authoritarianism led to a 2013 military coup d’etat and the election of former general Abdel Fattah el-Sisi as president in 2014. Chandler was residing in Cairo during all this political turmoil.Art pieces in the 2014 CARAVAN art exhibition, “AMEN: A Prayer for the World.” Photo: Amy SowderWhoever usurps power inevitably has ties to religious groups, whether it’s the Muslim Brotherhood, the Coptic Church, moderate Muslims or other religious allies, and often the religious-political sect that loses clout in top government loses dignity, freedom and all too often, their lives as well. So the cultural and religious clashes continue.“What we need is high visibility in the media of Christians and Muslims working together,” Chandler said. “It begins to shape the world view.” That’s his intent with uniting the artists for CARAVAN events.Rahman was born in Ismailia, Egypt, and is one of his country’s leading contemporary artists today. He grew up surrounded by Pharaonic monuments and Coptic monasteries, and it’s evident in his work. Also clear is his admiration for the female figure and women’s key role in the family and society at large.For his contribution to the “AMEN” exhibition, Rahman created an ancient Egyptian queen emanating good all around her while sitting on Set, the ancient Egyptian god of evil, which demonstrates her control over the forces of political Islam that have damaged civilization. Many of his works combine different systems of belief.“We’re only thinking one way,” Rahman said, “so I do my portraits in many ways, with the Jewish star and Christian cross and Muslim crescent. I want different people to feel we are the same, the same God also, just different culture only.”Rahman met Chandler while the Episcopal priest served from 2003 to 2013 as rector of the Church of St. John the Baptist/Maadi in Cairo, Egypt, the international English-speaking Episcopal/Anglican church within the Episcopal Diocese of Egypt and North Africa. Chandler is also a mission partner of the Episcopal Church, focused on the Middle East. Rahman was a participant artist the initial CARAVAN Exhibition of Visual Art in Cairo. This is his second year co-curating the CARAVAN art exhibition. He lives with his wife and children in Queens, New York, and they also have a home in Cairo.The last few years, Rahman’s art has dealt with the religious and political strife in Egypt, which applies to many areas of the Middle East, particularly the tumultuous Islamic extremism in Iraq and Syria.“In today’s world, we need peace,” Rahman said. “We don’t have to make all these problems.”For her art piece in the show, Jewish artist Lilianne Milgrom enjoyed researching about winged messenger angels in the Islamic, Jewish and Christian sacred texts. Born in Paris, France, Milgrom lived in Australia during part of her childhood and later spent 17 years in Israel before settling in Washington D.C.She received the “AMEN” sculptural form in the traditional Jewish sitting prayerful pose, and she added wings. The front of her angel’s chest is emblazoned with a QR code to connect the spiritual world with the digital world. Visitors can wave their cell phones in front of her sculpture to scan the code, which will take them to www.virtualangel.weebly.com, where they can post a prayer.“Prayer is a dialogue no matter which religion, and I wanted to make it interactive on whatever level the viewer is on, from atheist to believer,” Milgrom said.The prayers on the website do range from atheist to Christian, ethical humanist and beyond, with a variety of entries: “Please save us from ourselves,” “Peace for the World,” “Why?” and “May people see the good in each other.”Chandler wears a ring symbolizing the bridge a person can build to connect Muslims and Christians. Photo: Amy SowderMilgrom and Chandler will co-curate the 2015 Caravan exhibition, which will launch in Paris, France. Chandler is adamant that Caravan’s mission is to go further than encouraging interfaith dialogue.“I’m passionate about interfaith friendships,” Chandler said, slipping off the silver ring he wears, which depicts a person bridging the gap between the symbols of the Christian cross and Muslim crescent.“Friendship involves time and investment in the other,” he said. “CARAVAN is a creative catalyst for that.”— Amy Sowder is an ENS correspondent. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Smithfield, NC Stewart David Wigdor says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Rector Columbus, GA last_img read more

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South African primate hosts meeting to address future of mining

first_img Associate Rector Columbus, GA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Smithfield, NC [Anglican Communion News Service] Representatives of the South African mining sector, civil society and faith communities have met at Bishopscourt in Cape Town, at the invitation of the Archbishop of Cape Town, the Most Rev. Thabo Makgoba, to discuss the future of the mining industry in the country.The “Day of Courageous Conversations” was the first step in South Africa along a journey which began at the Vatican two years ago, when the Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace hosted a Day of Reflection in September 2013.The process continued with an Ecumenical Day of Reflection at Lambeth Palace in London, hosted by the Archbishop of Canterbury and the president of the British Methodist Conference, and more recently another Day of Reflection at the Vatican.“In this process, mining industry leaders are seeking to re-position the sector as one that can be a partner for long-term sustainable development with host communities and governments,” Makgoba said. “A key outcome of the global-level discussions held so far has been a recognition that the dialogue needs to be replicated at a local level in regions and countries where mining is an integral part of the socio-economic fabric.“To begin the conversations in South Africa, I agreed to host today’s meeting and to invite leaders from the mining industry – including both management and labor – to join representatives from the faith communities, civil society and government for a day of conversations.“About 60 participants were encouraged to share their perspectives and to hear those of others about what is needed to chart a different way forward for how the mining industry contributes to South Africa’s future.“We shared a commitment to seek collaborative solutions to the problems which threaten the sustainability of mining and the communities in which mines operate. I have every hope that the process which today’s discussion initiates will lead to action to develop creative new models of working constructively together.”South Africa is the world’s third largest exporter of coal; but its mining industry also produces large quantities of precious metals and minerals including gold, platinum, chrome, manganese, vanadium, vermiculite, ilmenite, palladium, rutile and zirconium.Mining is a significant factor in South Africa’s growing economy, but in recent years there has been growing tensions between miners and mine owners. These culminated in a large scale strike over safety issues in 2007.In 2012, a strike at the Lonmin-owned platinum mine at Marikana resulted in a series of violent confrontations between miners and the South African Police Service, resulting in the deaths of 34 people and 78 injured miners. It was the deadliest confrontation between police and civilians in the country since the Apartheid-era Sharpeville Massacre in 1960.Speech by the Most Rev. Thabo Makgoba, Anglican Archbishop of Cape Town, at the South African Day of Courageous Conversation.Representatives of the faith communities here present, leaders of the mining sector, representing both workers and management, representatives of government, who were invited here, members of civil society, members of the steering committee:Thank you all for being here today. I want to thank particularly those involved in the mining sector for coming, and for allowing yourselves to be vulnerable in taking these conversations forward.Why do I say that, and why are we calling this a day of courageous conversation? As many of you know, this is the South African step along a road which began at the Vatican two years ago, when the Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace hosted a Day of Reflection in September 2013. It continued with an Ecumenical Day of Reflection at Lambeth Palace in London, hosted by the Archbishop of Canterbury and the President of the British Methodist Conference, and more recently another Day of Reflection at the Vatican, which I was privileged to join.Those global-level meetings recognised that the dialogue they began needs to take place at local level, within countries where mining is part of the economic and social fabric of society. Here in South Africa, we have expanded the conversation to include what I call an inter-faith slant, reflecting the make-up of our particular society.And the fact that this conversation takes place within the context of South African society in 2015 also explains why it takes courage to join it. For, as I said a few days ago, when we marched to Parliament and the Presidency in a rally against corruption, too many of us have been intimidated into silence by our current rulers. Leaders who showed such courage in what I called the old struggle, the struggle against apartheid, now punish those who would speak out against their mismanagement of our country.Why am I, Thabo, involved in this initiative? Let me share with you an anecdote. My father, as a self-supporting church minister, had to find his own ways of taking care of his family. His way of doing it was to go every month to a factory shop in Johannesburg, a shop called Kitty Kit Hawkers’ Factory Supplies, and to buy beautiful clothing on credit.Then, starting around the 15th of every month, he and a friend would drive west of Johannesburg through Carletonville, Fochville, Potchefstroom, Stilfontein, Orkney and Klerksdorp, stopping at each mine, dropping off stock and collecting deposits, ending up at Lichtenburg. Every month, as they arrived at each mine and opened their boot, the miners knew, “Makgoba and Dichabe are here.”Then they would turn around and travel back to Johannesburg after pay day to collect their money. But my father didn’t complete his last trip – he fell ill, he came home to Soweto and he died in his bed. As the elder son, I was given the book in which his customers were recorded, so I set off to collect what he was owed, and I have never forgotten how touched the miners were when they heard of his death, and their absolute honesty in settling up their debts with me.They wanted me to continue the business, which of course I didn’t – but I did go back to the industry later after earning my degree, and worked as a psychologist for TEBA at the Rand Mutual Mine Hospital in Eloff Street Extension, where I was looking after miners who had suffered spinal cord injuries.So I come to this meeting knowing that the church has been to some degree involved in ministry to the mining industry. And we have ecumenical bodies such as the National Religious Association for Social Development, represented here, and the South African Council of Churches, that has done urban and industrial mission. But one of our objectives today is to acknowledge our shortcomings and our failures, and I want to say that the churches have failed the mining industry, both workers and managers.We have failed to take into account how risky mining is economically, one year a market-based success riding high on commodity prices, the next a business in quicksand. We have failed to understand the aspirations of people who want to earn R12,500 a month for working in conditions of extreme heat on stopes lying kilometres down in the earth.We have failed to understand the constraints on managers facing the relentless pressure of meeting shareholders’ expectations for better results every quarter, and who have to deal with resistance to social reforms from engineers and line managers responsible for the safe conduct of highly sophisticated and technically complex mining operations.There are times in our lives when we have to recognise that our past is what it is, and we cannot change it. However, as I have said previously to some of you, we can change the story we tell ourselves about it, and by doing that, we can change the future. I want the process we enter today to be one of lamentation, in the sense that the Book of Lamentations in the Old Testament of the Christian bible describes it.Generally held to have been written after the destruction of Jerusalem by the Babylonians, the book expresses what it means to experience suffering, but it goes further than that. In the words of one of my favourite theologians, Denise Ackermann, formerly of the universities of the Western Cape and of Stellenbosch: Lamenting “…is a refusal to settle for the way things are. It is reminding God that the human situation is not as it should be and that God as the partner in the covenant must act.”Lamentation is not navel gazing; it is not only exposing your vulnerability, but exposing it as a tool for leadership, because you can’t say let us move forward together without acknowledging the failures of the past.Today’s process does not involve me prescribing what should be discussed. Each of you must bring your own unique concerns and contributions to this conversation, and what is of overriding importance is that each one of us tries to put ourselves in the shoes of those with whom we are in dialogue.We need to be able to contribute here from the perspective of someone on the other side of an issue. But in the spirit of being just one participant among you, let me bring you my concerns, without suggesting they are any more valid or important than each of yours.Firstly, I come here today suggesting that we might best be placed to think about how we could work together on mine health and safety issues. There may well be other areas that we could partner on, but this might be the one tangible area we need to reflect on.You in the mining houses have mastered this area and you have reduced fatalities, but we in the churches have the injured in our communities, as well as those who contract HIV and Aids or TB while working on the mines. Churches pour a lot of energy, time and money in this area. Your experience in mine health and safety will find fertile hearts in the churches.Secondly, perhaps we should look at our records, as the mining industry and our response as the faith community, on environmental degradation. I have just returned from the Diocese of Matlosane, which encompasses the area around Klerksdorp, and while I was there, the bishop of that diocese took me around, showing me where the environment is being rehabilitated.Looking as those long pipes carrying slush across virgin land, I had to wonder: how safe and secure is that process? What are the risks of spillage, which apart from polluting the earth, could introduce dangerous levels of pollution to the Vaal River catchment area.I know that this is something the mines give a lot of attention to; but we in the church have been remiss in not getting ourselves involved in the process. As a result we are not in a position to make any responsible judgement about whether the mines are truly meeting their responsibilities.Also on the environment, our church has recently decided to consider disinvesting from the fossil fuel industry, so we would urge the industry to explore to its maximum potential the possibility of solar and other renewable energy.Thirdly, let me raise the issue of social cohesion. There has been renewed attention in recent days, notably after Thomas Piketty’s Mandela lecture, to the enormous disparities in wealth not only in our society but across the globe.The difference between our situation in South Africa and that in more economically developed countries is that, like no other issue we face, this one has the potential to blow our country apart. There is an urgent need for all of us – whether different companies in the industry or different groups in the faith community – to stop working in silos in the contexts within which we operate.Within the industry, mining companies need to join as a collective and raise the bar, especially in the areas of housing, health, schools and poverty alleviation. We acknowledge gratefully that millions have already been poured into these areas by yourselves, and there are complexities to deal with, but might it not work to pour resources into a common fund dedicated for your collective action?I have gone over my prescribed time, so let me make two further suggestions very briefly.Addressing labour: Labour, is it not time that we rethink the “class warfare” approach developed in the conditions of 19th century Europe, and look at “co-determination” models of working jointly with management?This does not mean that unions lose their right to bargain, but it can involve, for example, the separate representation of workers on management or supervisory boards of companies, such as is practised in a number of European countries.And addressing management here, is it not time to look at the huge disparity between executive pay and that of workers? I know that the amount of money that limiting executive pay would release for an average worker is negligible, but didn’t Nelson Mandela demonstrate to us the enormous power of symbolic action?And in case you think these are the ramblings of an idealistic archbishop, let me quote a man who spent a decade at the centre of the American financial system: William McDonough, formerly president of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, and a deputy to Fed chairman Alan Greenspan in the 1990s. He has quoted Matthew’s Gospel on loving our neighbour in suggesting, that there ought to be, and I quote him, “economic and moral limitations on the gaps created by the market-driven reward system”.Speaking in 2002 at Trinity Church Wall Street in New York, he said of the disparity between executive pay and that of the average American worker that “it is hard to find somebody more convinced than I of the superiority of the American economic system, but I can find nothing in economic theory that justifies this development.”To end these introductory words, my prayer for today is that each of you here will feel that this is a safe space, one in which you can speak your mind honestly, one in which we will listen to and really hear one another, instead of speaking past each other. Instead of focusing on micro, mine-specific issues, let’s look at macro, global issues, pursuing the common good as opposed to narrow self-interest.I also pray that these conversations won’t just be a talk-shop; that we will take tangible, implementable decisions to act; not only that, but that we will expand such conversations not only in the mining sector but for all wealth creators in our economy. Again as I have said before in similar settings, it’s time for us to turn to each other, not on each other. What is important is not where we start, but where we finish.So welcome to Bishopscourt, home and office to bishops and archbishops of Cape Town since 1848, a home where President Mandela spent his first night after being released from prison, and addressed the nation and the world from the very lawn on which you are seated.As some of you will know, this property was once an estate owned by Jan van Riebeeck, the Dutch settler who came here in the 17th century to establish a refreshment station for passing ships. Scattered on the hill behind us are the remains of a hedge of wild almond trees which the Dutch East India Company planted to keep the likes of me out of their settlement.As late as 1986, when Desmond Tutu came to live here, he had to do so in defiance of the Group Areas Act. So the very place in which we meet is a testimony that transformation can happen after years of oppression. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Africa, Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Events Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Albany, NY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Tags Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Shreveport, LA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service Curate Diocese of Nebraska Cathedral Dean Boise, ID AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Pittsburgh, PA center_img Anglican Communion Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Tampa, FL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 South African primate hosts meeting to address future of mining Rector Belleville, IL Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit an Event Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group By ACNS staffPosted Oct 12, 2015 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit a Press Release Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Knoxville, TN Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Collierville, TN last_img read more

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El material de Adviento ‘Preparándose para convertirse en la Amada…

first_img Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Episcopal Office of Public Affairs Submit an Event Listing Rector Belleville, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Tags Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Washington, DC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit a Press Release Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Press Release Service Rector Albany, NY Advent, Director of Music Morristown, NJ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Smithfield, NC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Pittsburgh, PA Un recién creado material de Adviento está ahora al alcance de los episcopales en todas partes para asumir el ministerio de reconciliación y restauración de Jesús. Cada congregación no tardará en recibir por correo un cartel múltiple y un paquete de materiales que, con el nombre de Preparándose para Convertirse en la Amada Comunidad [Preparing to Become the Beloved Community],contiene oraciones, reflexiones y actividades para cada semana de Adviento. Los materiales también pueden descargarse aquí.Preparándose se elabora a partir del documento y los materiales del concepto de Convertirse en la Amada Comunidad  que el obispo primado Michael Curry y la presidente de la Cámara de Diputados Gay Clark Jennings y los funcionarios que les respaldan presentaron a principios de este año. El documento plantea el compromiso a largo plazo de la Iglesia Episcopal con la reparación, la reconciliación y la justicia raciales.“Durante el Adviento, los cristianos se centran en cuánto necesitamos a Jesús para llevar luz, recuperación y esperanza a un mundo quebrantado”, señaló la Rda. Stephanie Spellers, canóniga del Obispo Primado para la Evangelización, la Reconciliación y el Cuidado de la Creación. “Este es un tiempo misterioso y vulnerable. Nos abrimos a Cristo. Nos abrimos a distintos prójimos y extraños que son Cristo entre nosotros. Esperamos que estos materiales respondan al auténtico anhelo de los episcopales de vivir como el pueblo del Movimiento de Jesús.A través del Adviento, una campaña en las redes sociales de la Iglesia Episcopal también promoverá esperanza, reflexión y acción en torno a la reconciliación racial; únase o siga usando el hashtag #adventbeloved.El Adviento comienza el domingo 3 de diciembre y concluye el Día de Navidad.Preparándose para llegar a ser la Amada Comunidad fue creado por el Equipo de Reconciliación Racial de la Iglesia Episcopal.Los materiales están concebidos para el uso de personas de todas las edades, entre ellos foros de adultos, Escuela Dominical, agrupaciones de mujeres y de hombres, preparativos de Adviento, reuniones de la Junta Parroquial, estudios de confirmación y mucho más.Cada una de las cuatro semanas de Adviento incluye lecturas bíblicas, reflexiones y actividades centradas en la trayectoria en espiral hacia la reparación, la reconciliación y la justicia raciales:• Adviento 1: Contar la verdad acerca de nuestras iglesias y razas.• Adviento 2: Proclamar el Sueño de la Amada Comunidad.• Adviento 3: Practicar el Camino del Amor en el modelo de Jesús.• Adviento 4: Enmendar la ruptura en las instituciones y en la sociedad.El concepto original de Convertirse en la Amada Comunidad expone estos temas visualmente en torno a un laberinto. “Es una manera diferente de abordar esta labor”, dijo Heidi Kim, funcionaria encargada de la Reconciliación Racial. “Es en verdad una invitación a la formación espiritual y a la transformación racial”.Para más información, diríjase a Emily Gallagher en [email protected] o 212-716-6242.#adventbeloved An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Callscenter_img Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Featured Events The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Collierville, TN Rector Bath, NC El material de Adviento ‘Preparándose para convertirse en la Amada Comunidad’ está ahora al alcance de congregaciones, diócesis y comunidades de fe Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Martinsville, VA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit a Job Listing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Cathedral Dean Boise, ID In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA Posted Nov 16, 2017 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZlast_img read more

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Diocese of New York bishops and spouses will be at…

first_imgDiocese of New York bishops and spouses will be at Lambeth2020 despite same-sex spouse exclusion Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Tags New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Posted Mar 1, 2019 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL House of Bishops Spring 2019, This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Pittsburgh, PA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Curate Diocese of Nebraska House of Bishops, Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The bishops of the Diocese of New York issued the following statement March 1 concerning their plans about the 2020 Lambeth Conference from which the Achbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby has decided to exclude same-sex spouses of bishops invited to the gathering.March 1, 2019To Our Dear Brothers and Sisters in the Diocese of New York,Many of you will have learned by now that Justin Welby, the Archbishop of Canterbury, has invited all active bishops in the communion, including gay bishops, to attend the 2020 Lambeth Conference. That is a positive development, since that was not true of the last Lambeth in 2008, when Bishop Gene Robinson was pointedly not invited to attend and participate. However, we are alarmed that at the same time he has said that spouses of bishops who are in same-sex marriages will not be invited. As of this writing that ruling affects a single bishop and spouse in the Anglican Church of Canada, and a single bishop and spouse in the Episcopal Church – Mary Glasspool and her spouse Becki Sander of our own diocese (though note that the bishop-elect of Maine is in a same-sex marriage, and when he becomes the bishop, this will apply to his spouse as well).In two weeks the House of Bishops will hold our spring meeting in North Carolina, and we expect this matter to occupy some of our time. However, as so many of you have contacted us to know the response we will make from this diocese, we are writing this letter now to inform you of our thinking, understanding that we have not yet been in conversation with the full community of our fellow bishops.Though this has only recently become public, we have actually been wrestling with this for some time. Archbishop Welby wrote a letter to Bishop Glasspool, and copied Bishop Dietsche, in early December, and the three of us have been in conversation on this matter for the time since. We have considered not attending, in protest over this extraordinary action. But in the end we have concluded that we cannot in conscience remove the voice of the Diocese of New York from the larger conversations at Lambeth regarding sexuality and the inclusion of LGBTQ people in the full sacramental life of the church. We certainly do not want to exclude the unique witness of Bishop Mary and her ministry from those debates and deliberations. So, not without mixed feelings, we the bishops of New York will be attending the Lambeth Conference.From the start, it has been the conviction of the spouses of Bishops Andy and Allen that they would fully and unambiguously support Becki, their sister and friend. They too look forward to being in conversation with the fuller community of bishops’ spouses, but at this time it is the intention of Becki Sander to accompany Bishop Mary to England, though she will not be permitted to participate in the Lambeth conversations and activities. Margaret Dietsche and Clara Mun are also planning to go to England, to stand with Becki.So much of our dismay over the Archbishop’s decision is that we are so blessed by the inclusion of members of the LGBTQ community in the full sacramental life of this diocese, including ordination and access to marriage for same-sex couples. We are graced by the lives and witness of the countless gay and lesbian priests, deacons and laypersons who have enhanced and magnified our common life by the depth of their faith, by their courage, and by the self-offering of their lives to the service to God and God’s children. We will be taking to Lambeth the lives and stories of the LGBTQ people of our diocese. We will be taking the hard histories and the holy graces of people who have asked only to receive from their church the dignity and love which they have received from their God. We will bear witness to the struggle and the triumph, and we will give voice at Lambeth to the voiceless many who will not be there. We will carry to Lambeth the spirit raised this year on the 50th anniversary of Stonewall in this our own diocese, and the celebration of World Pride Week. We go to Lambeth so that you will be at Lambeth.We ask your prayers for the Archbishop of Canterbury, for our two hundred congregations and us your bishops, for the worldwide community of bishops preparing to gather at Lambeth, for those who love us and for those who do not, for the LGBTQ community in the Episcopal Church and the Diocese of New York, and for the gay and lesbian Christians across our communion who do not yet enjoy the fullest possibilities and promise of the church. May the Holy Spirit come to Lambeth, that the prayer of Our Lord Jesus that “all may be one, as the father and I are one” may be realized in our day. With every good wish, we remainYours,The Right Reverend Andrew ML DietscheBishop of New YorkThe Right Reverend Allen K ShinBishop Suffragan of New YorkThe Right Reverend Mary D GlasspoolBishop Assistant of New York Featured Events Submit an Event Listing Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH center_img Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Albany, NY Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Bath, NC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Collierville, TN AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Lambeth Conference, Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Same-Sex Marriage Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Press Release Service Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit a Press Release Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Smithfield, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Job Listing Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Belleville, IL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC last_img read more

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Alabama elects Glenda Curry bishop coadjutor

first_img Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Tampa, FL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Albany, NY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel House of Bishops, Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Events Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Alabama elects Glenda Curry bishop coadjutor Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Belleville, IL Rector Bath, NC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Knoxville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Posted Jan 20, 2020 Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit an Event Listing Tags Rector Collierville, TN AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit a Press Release Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Bishop Elections, Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Women’s Ministry Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK The Rev. Glenda Curry was elected bishop coadjutor on Jan. 18. Curry is the first woman elected to lead the Diocese of Alabama and she will become the diocese’s 12th bishop. Photo: Sarah Sexton Photography[Diocese of Alabama] The Rev. Glenda Curry was elected bishop coadjutor to become the 12th diocesan bishop at the electing convention held on Jan. 18 at the Cathedral Church of the Advent in Birmingham. Curry is the first woman elected bishop in the Diocese of Alabama. She will succeed the Rt. Rev. John McKee Sloan upon his retirement at the end of 2020.To be elected, a candidate needed to receive a simple majority of votes from both clergy and lay delegates, voting separately on the same ballot round. Curry was elected on the second ballot, receiving 77 clergy votes and 127 lay votes.“We are grateful for the hard, faithful work of all the people involved in the search process,” said the Rev. Candice Frazier, president of the Standing Committee. “We are excited about the experience that the Rev. Curry brings to this ministry, and we will continue to support her and her family with love and prayer as we are guided by the Holy Spirit on this journey.”In addressing the gathering, Curry said “I’m overwhelmed and I’m humbled. I know that we can do whatever God points us to do, with God’s help. And that’s what I’m going to count on, your help and God’s help.”Curry serves as the rector of All Saints’ Episcopal Church, Birmingham. She has served as the rector of Epiphany Episcopal Church in Leeds. Prior to her ordination, Curry served as the president of Troy State University in Montgomery. She received her M.Div from the University of the South, Sewanee, in 2002. Curry is married to Dr. William Curry, a professor of medicine at the University of Alabama in Birmingham, and they are the parents of two adult children.According to the canons of The Episcopal Church, all bishop elections must receive the consent of a majority of diocesan bishops and diocesan standing committees. Following a successful consent process, Curry will be ordained and consecrated bishop on Saturday, June 27, 2020, at the Cathedral Church of the Advent, Birmingham, by the Most Rev. Michael Curry, presiding bishop of The Episcopal Church. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Press Release Service Youth Minister Lorton, VA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Shreveport, LA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books last_img read more

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Executive Council commits to anti-racism with resolutions and $400K in…

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Program Budget & Finance, Rector Pittsburgh, PA Press Release Service Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Cathedral Dean Boise, ID In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Featured Events Tags Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit a Job Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET George Floyd, Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Smithfield, NC Submit a Press Release Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Collierville, TN The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Tampa, FL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Course Director Jerusalem, Israel center_img Racial Justice & Reconciliation Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Washington, DC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Shreveport, LA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Youth Minister Lorton, VA COVID-19, Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Executive Council commits to anti-racism with resolutions and $400K in grants 2020 budget in ‘good shape’ for now Rector Martinsville, VA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Members of Executive Council sing a hymn for Morning Prayer during the final day of council’s virtual meeting on June 11.[Episcopal News Service] At its June 8-11 virtual meeting, The Episcopal Church’s Executive Council doubled down on the church’s anti-racism efforts, acknowledging in light of recent events that the church must do more, both to understand its own complicity in white supremacy and to dismantle it.In order for that to happen in a mostly white church, there needs to be a paradigm shift, said House of Deputies Vice President Byron Rushing. During his meditation for Morning Prayer on the final day of the meeting, Rushing shared his perspective as a black man being acutely aware of racism every day and challenged white members of council to have that mindset.“We can’t be honest about doing this work together until it is as equally important, every day, for you as it is for us, and that each of us know that,” Rushing said.Council passed several resolutions affirming the church’s racial justice work, emphasizing efforts to respond to the recent killings of black Americans by police and white vigilantes and highlighting the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 in communities of color.One resolution will send $150,000 to the Episcopal Church in Minnesota and $150,000 to the Diocese of Kentucky to “support their continuing work of dismantling the systemic racism we have created in this country and still permeates our church and society.”George Floyd, an unarmed black man, was killed May 25 in Minneapolis, Minnesota, while being detained by police. Officers pinned him to the ground for nearly nine minutes while one pressed his knee into Floyd’s neck as he repeated, “I can’t breathe.” That killing prompted protests nationwide and around the world denouncing police brutality. Protesters also have drawn attention to the March 13 killing of Breonna Taylor, a black woman fatally shot in her Louisville, Kentucky, home by police who were executing a “no knock” warrant.By providing substantial assistance to the dioceses that are responding to those two high-profile killings, Executive Council shows it is listening to Episcopalians who expect their church to take concrete action in opposing systemic racism, the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings, president of the House of Deputies, said June 10 during a committee discussion.“The church is waiting for us,” she said, adding that this emergency spending is offered to the dioceses with no strings attached. The bishops and diocesan leaders will decide how the money can best support racial justice work on the ground.Rushing also praised the work of the dioceses of Georgia and Atlanta in responding to the Feb. 23 killing of Ahmaud Arbery, a black jogger who was attacked and fatally shot by a white father and son in Glynn County, Georgia. Rushing and other church leaders chose not to include those two dioceses in the emergency funding, partly because the dioceses’ continued efforts don’t appear to depend on new spending.“They’ve done a tremendous amount of work, and we know where they are,” Rushing told the Joint Standing Committee on Mission Within The Episcopal Church.Rushing also helped draft two resolutions that reaffirmed The Episcopal Church’s commitment to racial justice work after the killings of Arbery, Taylor, Floyd and other black victims. One of the resolutions singled out Arbery’s killing as a case of “violent racial vigilantism” that brought to mind lynchings and other historic forms of racial terror. Arbery’s attackers, who said they thought he was a suspect in a series of recent break-ins, were not arrested in the killing for more than two months.Executive Council “praises the prompt response of the Episcopal people and churches in the Dioceses of Georgia and Atlanta to publicly call for justice in response to this heinous crime,” the resolution says.A parallel resolution focuses separately on cases of deadly police violence toward African Americans, citing Floyd and Taylor by name and praising the response of Episcopalians in Minnesota and Kentucky. It also calls on all Episcopalians “to organize, advocate, and dismantle systems, policies, and practices that reinforce police violence and brutality.”Executive Council approved another resolution that outlines specific criminal justice reforms that would improve police accountability and help protect people of color from violence. The resolution encourages Episcopalians to advocate for the reforms, including bans on chokeholds, stricter protocols on use of force, creation of community oversight bodies and federal review of killings by police.“Working to enact these policies is not a means to an end but one part in addressing systemic racism and providing long overdue protections to communities of color, ensuring that we live in a society that recognizes, values, and empowers all of God’s children,” the resolution concludes.When it was brought before council, the Rev. Devon Anderson of Minnesota noted that the resolution seemed to preclude any of the various proposals that fall under the umbrella of “defunding the police,” but ultimately offered her support, and the resolution passed easily.Another resolution addresses the toll that the COVID-19 pandemic has taken on communities of color, including indigenous communities, often because of barriers to adequate health care caused by poverty. Executive Council urged Episcopalians to “join with their communities in actively removing these barriers and addressing the social determinants of health.”The pandemic and national outrage over police brutality toward people of color also prompted Executive Council to adopt a new program of “rapid response” grants as part of its core racial reconciliation initiative, Becoming Beloved Community. Episcopal and Episcopal-affiliated entities are encouraged to apply this summer for grants of up to $10,000 to back immediate efforts “to address systemic racism and racial violence.” Executive Council approved up to $100,000 for those grants.While anticipating that the coming years will be some of the worst the U.S. economy has seen since the Great Depression, the Rev. Mally Lloyd, chair of the Joint Standing Committee on Finance, assured council that the church is in “solid financial shape.” Short-term reserves are above their targeted amount, with $12 million in unrestricted funds immediately available, and 2020 expenses are below budget so far.However, Lloyd and Treasurer Kurt Barnes warned that, while income in the first quarter was not seriously affected by COVID-19, they do not expect that to continue. Several dioceses have asked to defer their assessment payments, and two have requested emergency hardship assessment waivers. Council passed a resolution granting a full waiver of Colombia’s assessment and a partial waiver of the Dominican Republic’s assessment. That resolution also granted a partial waiver to the Diocese of Dallas as it works toward a full 15% payment in 2021. In addition, the Diocese of Honduras requested financial assistance, as its schools – which are its primary source of income – are now closed, but teachers are still being paid. Council approved a $50,000 grant for two months of payroll and asked the presiding officers to appoint a short-term task force to work with the diocese on financial sustainability.In light of expected income shortfalls from diocesan payments and investments, church staff were asked in April to identify immediate savings that could be implemented without personnel cuts. Staff identified $4.2 million in potential savings, and the finance committee went through the 2020 budget with those recommendations and other circumstances in mind. The committee ultimately put forward a resolution to make about $2 million in immediate budget cuts, much of it “low-hanging fruit” like travel expenses that are now moot. This sets a baseline for deeper cuts to be made as needed, in a “staged reduction” approach depending on how much income might decline.Lloyd praised church staff and the committee for their work on the budget, which she said struck a balance between saving up for an uncertain future and using the church’s resources now to address the immediate crises of racism and COVID-19, with a nod to the Biblical story of Joseph.“Are we in the stage of building and filling the barns against the future famine, or are we in the famine? … We’re in the cusp, I think,” Lloyd said.Council is next scheduled to meet Oct. 9-12, during which further budget discussions – as well as possible changes to the 2020 parochial report – are expected.– Egan Millard is an assistant editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] David Paulsen, editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service, contributed to this story. He can be reached at [email protected] Rector Albany, NY Executive Council June 2020, New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Executive Council, An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET By Egan MillardPosted Jun 11, 2020 Submit an Event Listing Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Knoxville, TN Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJlast_img read more

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Help Orange County grow an urban tree canopy

first_img Please enter your comment! Share your ideas at a community meeting next month From the Orange County Public Information OfficeOrange County has been selected for a study about beneficially integrating trees into the County’s storm water management programs.  Join us at a community meeting on Tuesday, June 13th from 5:30 to 7 p.m. to share your vision for protecting, restoring and increasing Orange County’s tree canopy.  The meeting will be held in the Commission Chambers, First Floor, County Administration Center, 201 South Rosalind Ave., Orlando, 32801.The consultant for the study, Green Infrastructure Center (GIC), will provide some background on the value of trees in helping communities comply with storm water permits, reduce flooding, and meet surface water quality goals. GIC will present maps detailing current tree canopy coverage in unincorporated areas of the County. As contributors to the study, attendees will be asked to provide input on the following concepts:perception of current County tree canopy coverage [For more info and services, check out tree maintenance experts in Apopka.]specific locations in Orange County that need more tree canopytree-related practices led by citizens or local government that could be implemented but are not currently in place“Those living and working in unincorporated Orange County have a good perception of the environment around them and what improvements they’d like to see in their neighborhoods,” said Lori Cunniff, deputy director of Orange County’s Community, Environmental and Development Services Department. “They have an investment in what happens in their community and their input is valuable in the planning process.”Orange County is one of only three municipalities in Florida selected by the Florida Forest Service (FFS) to participate in the study sponsored by the U.S. Forest Service, which covers seven southeastern states. Funding for GIC’s technical assistance is being provided through a grant provided by the FFS.“This environmental strategy is intended to map, evaluate, protect and restore urban forests to achieve better stormwater management and clean water,” said Louis Shepherd, FFS coordinator of the Urban and Community Forestry Programs.Orange County is required to contribute by matching the funding awarded by the FFS grant.   As part of this match, Orange County is performing a tree inventory and analysis to help quantify the composition, health, and environmental and economic benefits of the urban forest in unincorporated areas. These efforts support a strategy in Orange County’s “Our Home for Life” community sustainability plan that seeks to promote urban forestry and expand tree canopy.For more information about the community meeting or the tree canopy and stormwater study, please contact David Jones via e-mail at [email protected] or via phone at 407-836-1434. To register, go here. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter TAGSOrange CountyTree Canopy Previous articleAAA tow to go program available on Memorial Day weekendNext articleMemorial Day: How to Honor the Fallen Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Please enter your name here Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom last_img read more

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4 ways to make your home comfortable and safe for your…

first_img For millions of Americans, pets are a member of the family. They provide companionship and countless memories that last a lifetime. Having a pet-friendly home increases the likelihood that these memories will be positive.These tips can make pet ownership simpler, and create a safer, healthier environment for your four-legged companion.Pet-friendly flooringCarpeted flooring can be a challenge for pet owners. Carpet traps unpleasant odors and is difficult to clean. Hardwood, bamboo, laminate and other alternatives – when properly maintained – offer a surface that’s easier to clean, doesn’t trap allergens and doesn’t hide fur or other debris.Experts like Lumber Liquidators offer a wide selection of flooring options, so you’re sure to find a style and look that will complement your home and is perfect for your pet.A space to call their ownMany pets seek shelter when startled by loud noises. Whether it’s the clap of thunder or a boisterous guest, an unexpected noise can send your animal fleeing (or peeing). Having a dedicated space for your pet, be it a mudroom, doorless closet or comfy bed, provides a safe place for your animal during times of stress.Also, pets need a little down time every once in a while. A cozy nook away from direct sunlight provides a perfect place for them to relax and recharge.Picking the best paintEven the cleanest of pets can leave marks on your walls. Choosing the right paint can make the difference between a permanent stain and one that’s easily removed. Lower sheens can be difficult to clean, so opt for semi-gloss or satin.Also, depending on your climate, you may prefer a light or dark paint color. Light colors can help keep your pet cool by reflecting the sun, while darker colors absorb the sun’s heat and can warm the home environment.Protect your curious petPets are inherently curious. If it’s within reach, chances are it will be investigated with a detective’s attention. Even if the food is safe for pets, the packaging may be harmful. Medications, cleaners and cosmetics should also be kept on high shelves or behind a latched cabinet.Most pet owners know to keep food and toxins off accessible surfaces, but it’s easy to forget something on a bedside table or the edge of a counter.Pets require time, attention and love. They will return the favor more naturally in an environment that’s comfortable and safe. Consider these tips for creating a pet-friendly home. Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 TAGSPet-friendly Previous articleTravel Tips For 3-Day-WeekendsNext articleThis is the Week to Look at Mars Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate Please enter your comment! The Anatomy of Fear Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Please enter your name here You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replylast_img read more

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Does CNN’s quiz really test your knowledge of Christianity?

first_img Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 CNN is using a quiz to promote its new shows, “Finding Jesus” and “Believer.” The quiz is portrayed as a test of one’s knowledge of Christianity and the Bible.But is it?Let’s look at the questions CNN is asking (these are multiple-choice questions):Which South Asian country did Thomas reach?Which dish is prepared in massive amounts in Haux, France, on what’s known as Easter Monday?Methuselah is the longest-living person mentioned. How old was he when he died?Which common household item do Norwegians hide to keep evil spirits at bay on Christmas eve?Which body of water did Jesus walk on?How long was Pope Urban VII in power?In the Belgian town of Binche, which objects are thrown at revelers on Fat Tuesday (Mardi Gras)?Which European city is home to a relic purported to be the veil worn by the Virgin Mary at Jesus’ birth?Which African nation has a church that purportedly houses the Ark of the Covenant?Which of these animal has become to symbolizes immortality?At the end you get your score and then are told, “If you want to brush up on your knowledge of Christianity, tune into the CNN Original Series “Finding Jesus” at 9 ET Sunday nights, followed by “Believer” at 10.”Sorry CNN, but there are only two questions (#3 and #5), that have anything to do with the Bible. Most of these are about local traditions. The Anatomy of Fear Brian March 20, 2017 at 9:21 am Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Flo Tapley Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Reply Reply Use this link if you want to take the CNN Quiz: Do you have faith in your knowledge of Christianity? Thank you Dale for adding the link to REAL Bible quizes. Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate Realistically there are only TWO questions that relate to Christianity. The rest are related to various traditions or rituals or history. But nothing anybody would need to “brush up” on relate to “Christianity”.center_img Please enter your comment! March 20, 2017 at 10:18 am Use this link if you want to take real bible quizes. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Reply I became a priest more than 40 years ago. This quiz I found to be ridiculous and having little to do with the Bible or the Christian faith. Where does CNN get these writers? Father Robert March 19, 2017 at 12:54 pm TAGSChristianity Previous article“Sign, sign, everywhere a sign…”Next articleLegendary musician Chuck Berry dead at 90 Dale Fenwick RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Please enter your name here You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here 3 COMMENTSlast_img read more

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