September, 2019 Archive

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Spotify Enlists Its Users to Add Music Metadata EXCLUSIVE

Spotify has found a new way to beef up its knowledge about music: The company has begun to solicit music metadata suggestions from its users, asking them to describe genres of albums or moods of songs.“Listeners describe music in different ways, and understanding that information will help improve, extend, and confirm the information that describes music on Spotify,” a spokesperson recently told Variety. “We hope to better understand how Spotify listeners interpret music, so that we can improve experiences for both listeners and artists.”To that end, Spotify quietly opened up Line-In, a music metadata editor, to all of its users this month. Users of Spotify’s desktop app can access line-in by clicking on the three dots next to any song, album, or artist, and select “suggest an edit.” Popular on Variety ×Actors Reveal Their Favorite Disney PrincessesSeveral actors, like Daisy Ridley, Awkwafina, Jeff Goldblum and Gina Rodriguez, reveal their favorite Disney princesses. Rapunzel, Mulan, Ariel,Tiana, Sleeping Beauty and Jasmine all got some love from the Disney stars.More VideosVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9Next UpJennifer Lopez Shares How She Became a Mogul04:350.5x1x1.25×1.5x2xLive00:0002:1502:15 Line-In’s web interface.From there, they are taken to Line-In’s web interface, which lets them suggest a wide variety of attributes, including the language of the lyrics of any given song, aliases used by an artist and even links to external websites.Spotify first began testing Line-In with a subset of its audience last fall. “Over the past few months, we’ve confirmed our beliefs that listeners care deeply about the content on Spotify—they want the data to be useful and accurate,” said the company’s spokesperson.“We’ve also seen that listeners are eager to describe the music they’re passionate about in ways beyond traditional concepts like genre and mood.” That’s why the company added the ability to use tags as descriptors as well.It’s worth noting that Spotify treats all these data submissions as suggestions; users don’t have the ability to directly edit the metadata for music in Spotify’s catalog. “Spotify considers the source, and thoroughly reviews and checks the accuracy of this information, before the suggestions are folded into the data that powers our services,” its spokesperson clarified.The company not only checks whether your submissions match what other users are saying, but also keeps track of your past performance. For instance, Line-In includes a number or surveys to test a submitter’s music knowledge. And if you completely mess up on your hip-hop test, you might have a harder time making your future contributions about the genre count.Spotify is the first music service of its size to launch a tool like Line In — but the move is consistent with the emphasis the company has put on data in the past. Back in 2014, Spotify acquired The Echo Nest, a music metadata provider, for a reported $100 million.And this month, it revealed in its F-1 filing with the SEC that it had amassed a total of 200 petabytes (about 200,000 terabytes) of data about music and the way its users access it. In the process of recommending, selecting and playing music, it accesses 5 petabytes of this data every single day. read more

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10 reasons why PS4 already has Xbox One beat

first_img 1 2 Yesterday was a little intense if you managed to follow all the live streams that were happening at E3. It started with Microsoft’s Xbox One event, then we had EA, Ubisoft, and finally Sony late in the evening showing off the PS4 for the first time. You’d be forgiven for not noticing Apple gave its WWDC keynote during the day, too.Now that the dust has settled, both Sony and Microsoft have dropped the major details of their next gen consoles, and it’s clear that Sony is the pre-launch winner. Microsoft has already upset gamers with talk of compulsory game installs, restricted used game sales and lending, and the requirement of an Internet connection. Then they announced the price, which isn’t great.Sony on the other hand seemingly delivered most of the things gamers were hoping for, and the general consensus is they “won” E3. But you can also argue they have already won the next-gen console battle, and here’s 10 reason why:The PS4 is cheaperI’ve stated a few times before that whichever console ends up carrying the lower price will have a advantage at launch. In this regard, Sony really has delivered by pricing the PS4 $100 cheaper than the Xbox One. That’s $399 for the Xbox versus $499 for the PS4.To put that in perspective, let’s assume games will cost $60 each. So come launch day you’ll be able to take home a PS4 and two games for $520. That’s only $20 more than the Xbox One costs.To do the same with the Xbox One you’ll need to spend $620. You need to factor in the games as nobody will just buy the console on its own. If Sony really wants to hit home the price advantage they could do a launch day package including a PS4 and two games for the same price as an Xbox One.No used game restrictionsThe biggest win for Sony at E3 yesterday was its used games policy. Sony has decided to keep everything exactly the same, and just the way gamers (and retailers) like it. Games will play from disc and can be traded in freely. Lending a game to a friend is as simple as giving them the disc to play.This is in stark contrast to the Xbox One where you can still sell your games, but it has to be done using a retailer registered with Microsoft’s used games program. You can lend your games to others, but only for a short period of time (30 days). Publishers can also completely block used game sales and lending on a per game basis.This used game policy difference alone will drive many gamers to select PS4 over Xbox One, and it’s probably the biggest mistake Microsoft has made for this coming generation of hardware.No Internet connection requiredNext to the restricted used games policy, the feature many gamers don’t like about the Xbox One is its need to regularly phone home. You can’t own Microsoft’s console without also having an Internet connection, which immediately limits the market for its use and rules it out completely for the armed forces, for example.Sony has not implemented the same restrictions for the PS4. You can play games offline and the only time you require a connection is when playing multiplayer or want to access PSN. This means the PS4 appeals to a much larger global market and there’s no concern your games will just stop working at some point in the future because servers are being turned off.The PS4 is region free and you can upgrade the hard driveJust like the PS3, Sony has ensured that PS4 owners can upgrade the 500GB hard drive it ships with themselves. So if you want to add a multi-terabyte drive to the PS4, you’re welcome to do so. Another plus point is the fact the PS4 will be region free. Games won’t be region locked by Sony, although it seems likely publishers will have that option if they want to use it.This is in contrast to the Xbox One, which contains a hard drive you can’t upgrade yourself. So if there’s an issue with it, or you run out of storage space, you’re pretty much stuck or reliant on Microsoft carrying out a repair or have to invest in external storage. The Xbox One is also expected to be region locked.Strong support for indie developersSony has decided to embrace indie developers for this generation of PlayStation, to the point where indies can even publish their own games.This support was shown at the first PS4 reveal when Jonathan Blow was brought out on stage to announce his next game The Witness will be on PS4. But since then we’ve had several other indie games confirmed for the console. With Sony making it much easier to get indie games on to the PS4, that’s sure to see many more titles added for download over the console’s lifetime.Microsoft made a claim yesterday during that they are a big supporter of indie developers on Xbox consoles, which got more than a few confused looks and outbursts on Twitter. On stage, they didn’t do much to convince us indie games were a major focus, with Minecraft: Xbox One Edition being the major reveal. Microsoft has also stated indie developers can’t self publish and will need to find themselves a publisher before being accepted on to Xbox One.Next page: Retailer support, hardware performance, and a big marketing advantage…last_img read more

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Mental Samurai and the History of HighIQ Game Shows

first_img Syfy Axes ‘Krypton’ Superhero Series After 2 SeasonsWhat to Stream on Amazon Prime This Weekend Stay on target This week saw the premiere of Mental Samurai, a new game show on FOX hosted by Rob Lowe that promises a “mental obstacle course” where contestants have to tackle a dozen difficult questions in five minutes for a chance at $100,000. The whole time, they’re encased in a transparent pod that rotates 360 degrees around the set to face multiple monitors. It’s a real brain-melter, and makes other game shows on the air look like child’s play.But game shows haven’t always been Wheel of Fortune-easy. The genre has plenty of examples of programs that tested the limits of the best and brightest. Let’s delve back into the archives to explore game shows that were for super brainiacs only.Dr. I.Q.Interestingly enough, radio quiz shows and TV ones were fairly contemporaneous in development – both debuted in the late 1930s. Dr. I.Q. was one of the first big ones on the radio, and it made the jump to television in 1953. The program was primitive by modern standards — the host would pose questions to the audience, and randomly selected members who answered correctly would be rewarded with silver dollars for their efforts, as well as a chance to spin the “Wisdom Wheel” for a hundred bucks. The show was wildly successful, but it wasn’t easy — the questions ranged widely from general interest trivia to real puzzlers.Twenty-OneWe can’t talk about game show history without touching on the scandals that rocked the industry in the late 1950s. Shows like Twenty-One and The $64,000 Question built incredible drama with contestants racking up strings of wins answering increasingly difficult questions. Only one problem, though: they were rigged. Initial airings of Twenty-One were dismal failures because the questions were too hard, leading the producers to recruit contestants and give them instructions, answers and stage directions. On $64,000, they did the opposite — the show would deliberately give more difficult questions to contestants the sponsors disliked to get them booted off the show quicker. Those scandals basically killed the difficult game show for several decades.GE College BowlWidely regarded as one of the toughest shows of its era, GE College Bowl, which debuted in 1959, pit four-member teams of college students against each other to win grants and scholarship funds for their school. Formatted like an athletic contest, the show was wildly popular on both TV and the radio, and it pushed its young players to their mental limits with increasingly difficult questions as teams struggled to hang on for five shows straight and retire as undefeated champions. In 1962, Britain launched its own version of the show, the long-running University Challenge.JeopardyThere was one exception, though. One of the longest-running game shows on television, Jeopardy (stream it on Netflix) premiered in 1964 and has remained on the air for over half a century. The show’s essential gimmick — they provide the answers, you say the questions — wasn’t particularly original, but Jeopardy built a following for its robust range of subject matter and willingness to go deep into a variety of subjects. The show also ramped up the difficulty even further for the annual Tournament of Champions. Even the process for getting on the show is rigorous, requiring a 50-question practice test followed by a second written test and a mock game session.Win Ben Stein’s MoneyNasal-voiced conservative actor Ben Stein is probably best known for his role in Ferris Bueller’s Day Off, but he’s also a noted pundit and evolution denier who had his own game show in the late 1990s. The gimmick of Win Ben Stein’s Money was that he was putting his paycheck up against the contestants – if they beat him in answering the show’s often very difficult problems, they’d take home the cash earmarked for his salary. The difficulty in Win Ben Stein’s Money came not just from the questions, but from the fact that normies had to compete against Stein directly.Winning LinesWhile some games on this list are here because of their questions, the short-lived Winning Lines was bone hard because of its complex and unusual rules. The game started with a collection of 49 contestants, each assigned a unique number. Questions are asked and the answer is one of those numbers — if it’s yours and you buzz in, you go on to the next round. From there, things got even weirder, as future rounds were more complex and culminated with a final segment where the winner had 15 seconds to memorize the answers to 45 questions and then forced to give both the answers and their number on the screen. It was a mess and didn’t last long, with the U.S. version on the air for just over a month.Only ConnectBritain has a reputation for quiz shows that definitely push the envelope when it comes to difficulty, and Only Connect is a sterling example. The program, which debuted in 2008, has an unusual format for its questions. Teams are given sets of clues and must come up with the connective tissue that unites them in a scant forty seconds. And that’s just the opening round — as the game goes on, things get more and more devious, until teams must organize a group of sixteen clues into a matrix of four connected sets. It’s hard to describe and even harder to do, with fans playing along at home frequently puzzled by the show’s obtuse but bulletproof logic.The GeniusThe English-speaking world doesn’t have a lock on high-I.Q. game shows, and one of the toughest and coolest we’ve seen comes from South Korea. The Genius is a unique hybrid of reality TV and quiz show, where thirteen contestants from different walks of life are brought together in a house to compete with one another in a variety of mental challenges. In addition to cognitive skills, the tests in The Genius measure emotional intelligence and intuition. It’s available subtitled and is definitely worth a watch if you’re into smart people putting it all on the line for fame and fortune.Mental Samurai airs at 9 p.m.EST on Fox.More on Geek.com:Jeopardy’s Alex Trebek Contractually Obligated to Beat CancerRemembering ‘Solitary,’ the Cruelest Reality Show Ever MadeRemembering ‘Babylon 5,’ One of the Smartest Sci-Fi Series Ever, 25 Years After Its Debutlast_img read more

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Teenager who created massive Skyrim mod Falskaar lands job at Bungie

first_imgBack in July we heard about the work of 19-year-old Alexander J. Velicky. He wanted to get a job at Bethesda, so set about creating a mod for Skyrim. But this wasn’t just any mod, this was Falskaar, a mod that has a land mass about a third of the size of Skyrim’s entire world, and he created it all by himself.Falskaar isn’t just big in terms of environment size, though, it actually adds around 25 hours of new content to the game. Velicky spent over 2,000 hours creating new quests, characters, items, as well as doing new voice work and creating a soundtrack. He’s an all-rounder, and someone Bethesda surely had to take notice of.However, Bethesda apparently didn’t take any notice and didn’t even offer him an interview for a job. But don’t let that put you off creating your own mod in an attempt to enter the games industry because creating Falskaar has earned Velicky a pretty sweet new role. He is now working, not for Bethesda, but for Bungie.After being overlooked at Bethesda, Velicky started applying for other jobs in the industry, including companies he thought he’d never have a chance of working for. But he was surprised to find someone at Bungie took notice of his work on Falskaar and clearly saw he had talent. Velicky has since been offered and accepted the position of Associate Designer at Bungie where he will be working on their latest project in production: Destiny.Posting on the Bethesda forums Velicky thanks the community and passes on what he calls a “corny life lesson.” He says no one should be afraid to try, and if they set their sights on a goal it’s just a case of working hard to achieve it. Working at Bungie is proof that works.last_img read more

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Watch Street Fighter V live gameplay today

first_imgToday marks the first time we get to see Street Fighter V gameplay live, and it’s all thanks to the Capcom Cup kicking off at 2:30pm EST. We’ve included the live feed below so you can tune in and watch the whole event, which is expected to last around 8 hours.The Capcom Cup marks the end of a year of tournaments for the Street Fighter IV Pro Tour, with 16 players left for the final competition. Whoever places first today will receive a $30,000 pot, and there’s a further $20,000 up for grabs during the tournament.Although the Cup gets underway at 2:30pm, the tournament doesn’t begin until 3:30pm. However, if you are only interested in seeing Street Fighter V played live, then I believe Capcom is keeping that back until the Special Announcement section of the broadcast right at the end of the day. It begins at 10:15pm.Capcom confirmed that Street Fighter V was in development last weekend, a day after the teaser video leaked on YouTube. You can watch it below:We don’t have a release date yet, but Capcom has also announced that Ultra Street Fighter IV is being updated for re-release on the PS4. It seems likely that game is going to be used as a stop-gap release while we wait for Street Fighter V development to be finished. The other big news is the game will only be heading to PS4 and PC, and there will be cross-play between the platforms.last_img read more

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New emulator lets you play any NES game in 3D

first_imgThe Nintendo Entertainment System (NES) was a very successful piece of gaming hardware for Nintendo. Released in 1983, it was still available to buy until 2008 and over the course of its lifetime over 800 officially licensed games were released. Many gamers still play some of those titles today, be it on original hardware, a Retron 5, re-releases on other machines, or through an emulator.A new emulator has appeared on the scene recently that adds an unusual new feature: you can play NES games in 3D. The emulator is called 3DNes and it achieves the pseudo-3D effect by converting each 2D sprite in a game into a layered 3D object. The end result varies in how good it looks on a per game basis, but this gameplay video below gives you a good idea of how it works:One interesting side effect of converting all the sprites to 3D objects is that it allows for a first-person mode to be activated. Here’s Super Mario Bros. running with the player viewing the action from Mario’s perspective:The emulator should work with any NES game, although the test pool used consists of the most popular titles, including Dr. Mario, Legend of Ninja, Mega Man, Super Mario Brothers 3, Zelda II: The Adventure of Link, Contra, and Castlevania.If you’d like to try the emulator out for yourself just head on over to the website where it is hosted. It’s a little slow to load and you may get a script warning, which you must continue past, but it does work. And if development continues, this could be a NES emulator everyone wants to play their favorite game (in first-person mode) with.last_img read more

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Correct Names Twitter Calls It Like It Sees It

first_imgStay on target Raw Bacon pic.twitter.com/gtG4J9nheg— Correct Names (@CorrectNames) July 22, 2017 Energy Sausage pic.twitter.com/uv6ii1MYwt— Correct Names (@CorrectNames) July 26, 2017 Prison Pony pic.twitter.com/BookNWioXD— Correct Names (@CorrectNames) April 12, 2017 Pull on some feet gloves, grab a glass of snowman blood, and relax on the human shelf while learning the “correct names” for socks, water, and sofa.Less than four months old, the Twitter account of the same name describes everyday things as they should be labeled.Eyes, for example, are really just skull windows. And, let’s be honest, snow is nothing more than cloud dandruff. Elon Musk’s Cheeky ‘Nuke Mars!’ Post Is Taking Over TwitterTwitter Tests Subscribe-to-Replies Feature center_img Bagel Seeds pic.twitter.com/xMw7j6KEha— Correct Names (@CorrectNames) July 11, 2017Let us know what you like about Geek by taking our survey. T-REX Deer pic.twitter.com/c9pXPF6gGG— Correct Names (@CorrectNames) June 17, 2017“Correct Names was a page I thought of when I was on holiday with my family at Easter,” Dempsey said.“I was talking to my mum about something, and I couldn’t remember the ‘real’ name of the object I was describing,” he continued. “So I came up with other names for it, and thus @CorrectNames was born.”Most of the tweets “are from my own mind,” according to Dempsey, who receives “a lot of submissions,” only a handful of which get published.“They need to be good as I’m quite OCD with the look of the account,” he added.The Manchurian teenager balances his acting studies at the Academy of Live & Recorded Arts (ALRA) North with work as a content creator for marketing agency Social Chain.All while inventing hilarious, often bizarre descriptions for everything from food and animals to appliances and instruments. Panda Fish pic.twitter.com/qZCevz9SS7— Correct Names (@CorrectNames) June 5, 2017The account, run by 19-year-old student Mark Dempsey, offers regular suggestions for more appropriate terms: Mirror? More like ego booster/destroyer. (Check out some more of my personal favorites in this post.)@CorrectNames boasts 120,000 followers, including Entertainment Weekly social media editor Alex Steinman, Team Canada rugby player Ray Barkwill, and The Orchid Thief author Susan Orlean. (And, now, me!)“I … receive a lot of messages from people praising the account, which is a nice touch,” the creator told Geek in an email.Dempsey is no stranger to viral social media sensations: He previously contributed to the “put Titanic music on things” trend. Car Juice pic.twitter.com/9NwP9wk9KI— Correct Names (@CorrectNames) June 10, 2017last_img read more

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Grow Fresh Air At Home With Clairy Smart Planter

first_img Kickstart This Sleep Box Inspired by Mark Zuckerberg’Legend of the White Dragon’ Reunites Original Power Rangers Stay on target Some 4.3 million people die every year from exposure to indoor air pollution, according to the World Health Organization.Sure, that’s predominantly in developing area, where folks cook in and heat poorly ventilated homes with solid fuels (wood, coal, dung, crop wastes). But why take a chance?San Francisco-based Clairy is on a mission to “sensitize people towards green ethics and healthcare issues”—with its flowerpot-cum-air purifier.Choose from nine NASA-approved filtering plants (via Clairy)Dubbed “the most amazing natural air purifier,” Clairy combines nature and technology to analyze and eliminate household toxins like benzene, xylene, ammonia, trichloroethylene, and formaldehyde—often found in rubber, cleaners, paint, synthetic fibers, and other everyday items.Get headaches and bouts of dizziness at home? Suffer from allergies or asthma? That’s just the half of it: Long-term exposure to certain contaminants can cause cancer.Enter Clairy—a made-in-Italy dual-part ceramic flowerpot. Hiding inside is a technology unit attached to a fan, which directs air from inside your home to the roots of the plant to be detoxified. Sensors test indoor air quality (IAQ), temperature, and humidity and send real-time mobile updates to your smartphone or tablet.Clairy combines nature and technology to analyze and eliminate household toxins (vla Clairy)“The tech unit forces air into the roots of your plant and eliminates toxic agents, making the air you’re breathing better for you,” the firm’s 2016 crowdfunding campaign said.“Clairy can give you tips on how to adjust and improve the quality of your air. So, not only does Clairy help you learn of the problem—it solves it,” the site boasted.The contemporary jardinière can clean 80 percent of a heavily polluted 53-square-foot room in 30 hours.Spruce up your home with the Clairy air purifier (via Clairy)A successful Indiegogo campaign means the addition of a self-watering system and an LED air quality indicator, which lights up to signify the IAQ.Currently in the production stage, all Clairy units are expected to ship to early-bird buyers by mid-November. Everyone else can pre-order the product—available in four original colors (alabaster, blue, aquamarine, coral—for $189) and two “premium” finishes (for $329), with your choice of nine NASA-approved filtering plants.For every post-crowdfunding Clairy sold, the company will donate ten trees via reforestation non-profit Eden Projects, “so that we can all benefit from more trees and better air.”Let us know what you like about Geek by taking our survey.last_img read more

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Ankis Vector Home Robot is Siri Meets WallE

first_img Get Used to ‘Fortnite’s’ Powerful Mech SuitsRobots to Compete in Underground Challenge in Mining Tunnels Stay on target If we’re going to get robots in all of our future Jetsons homes than we’re going to have to stop speculating about it and start actually doing it. At least, that’s what Anki believes. Other companies produce pricey prototype and frighteningly powerful robots that only live inside hypothetical labs. But Anki wants to create humble deep learning machines people can actually afford and therefore have impressive yet more modest and friendlier sets of features.This philosophy worked well with Anki’s successful Cozmo kid robot and Overdrive smart racing toys. But Vector, the team’s next product, is going for something more mature. We recently got to check out this upcoming smart home robot that’s basically Siri meets Wall-E.Anki compares Vector’s power to a tablet, and that makes sense looking at its raw specs. It’s got a Qualcomm Snapdragon Quad Core 1.2GHz processor, Wi-Fi and Bluetooth, cameras and microphones, touch sensing, and an optional companion mobile app. But what makes it more than just a computer is the way all this technology is presented.Superficially similar to Cozmo, Vector is a little palm-sized robot. But the gizmo’s bigger brain allows it to act more like an autonomous organism since it doesn’t need to pair to an app. This is a crux of Anki’s ambition with this device. They intend for Vector to be robot that just roams around your house learning and helping users out with its own A.I. agency. It can even navigate back to its charging stand on its own. The goal is for users to get comfortable with Vector just always being around and forge a more social, personal connection compared to static one-way interactions like giving Alexa a command.To pull this off, the team has put a lot of work into making Vector this plausible puppy-like critter you play and live with. Its movements were created by 3D cartoon animators working with a virtual version of the limited physical design. Combined with the expressive light up eyes and in person Vector has a stunning amount of charm for a pile of parts. It sells the illusion that the machine really is exploring its environment and reacting to your specific voice and touch. It’s like a Pixar creation in how it endearingly avoids the uncanny valley. Even when it doesn’t respond “properly” to you it feels right in an animal kind of way.Vector’s actual functionality beyond companionship is a little more standard. It can tell you the time, weather, and answers to search questions pulled from online cloud data. It can act as a timer. If you give it security permissions it can use its camera like a watchdog or just take nice pictures of you. It can even play Blackjack and other games with its little cube.Vector’s integration with other smart home technology, whether it’s smart speakers or light bulbs, is still a bit up in the air though. That’s unfortunate because concrete details there would go a long way towards improving the product’s actual practical utility. I want Vector to start playing some vaporwave music if I pet it in just the right way. But what is cool is that soon Vector will eventually support accessible coding languages like Scratch and Python.Its features may still need some fleshing out, but conceptually and tangibly Vector is absolutely a robot I’d let roll around my apartment hanging out with me or just doing its own thing. If you’re also interested than check out Anki’s Kickstarter early pre-order campaign before Vector launches for real on October 12 for $250.For more on cute robots check out these cyber centaurs and popcorn-powered machines.Anki CozmoAnki OverdriveLet us know what you like about Geek by taking our survey.last_img read more

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SpiderMan Arrives Exclusively on PS4 This September

first_img ‘Spider-Verse’ Creators Plan Sony Marvel TV ShowsWatch These Movies Before ‘Spider-Man: Far From Home’ Let us know what you like about Geek by taking our survey. Sony Interactive Entertainment and Insomniac Games have announced that Spider-Man will swing to the PlayStation 4 on September 7. Along with the announcement, the companies also revealed the game’s cover art and collector’s edition.The game’s cover features Spider-Man web-slinging against a red backdrop. Though Spidey is wearing a brand-new outfit, his pose is inspired by classic Spider-Man covers of the past. Over on the PlayStation Blog, James Stevenson, Community Director for Insomniac Games said: “fans of the wall-crawler will see nods to the work of J. Scott Campbell, Mark Bagley, John Romita Sr., John Romita Jr., Joe Quesada and (of course) Steve Ditko, as well as many other iconic Spider-Man artists.”As with most big releases nowadays, Spider-Man has several different editions. The standard edition costs $59.99 and is available both in retail and digitally. The Digital Deluxe edition costs $79.99 and includes a copy of the game and new story chapters through the DLC series, Marvel’s Spider-Man: The City That Never Sleeps. Those who pre-order the Digital Deluxe edition will also get a limited edition collectible pin sent to them by mail. The pin features Spider-Man from the game’s cover.The showstopper is, of course, the Collector’s Edition. This $149.99 box set includes all the digital content from the Digital Deluxe edition, a steelbook case featuring the “iconic” white spider, a mini art book from Titan Books, and a Spider-Man statue by Gentle Giant. Stevenson notes that the Spider-Man statue is perched “on top of something” that will be revealed at a later time.Speaking of things that’ll be announced later, the aforementioned DLC expansions will contain three new chapters. Each chapter contains new missions, villains, characters, and more suits for Spider-Man. We don’t know when these items will be revealed, but it should be soon.Pre-ordering any edition of the game gets users a Spidey-Suit Pack featuring Spider-Punk and other suits being revealed this summer. Other goodies include the Spider-Drone gadget, a PSN avatar, an original PS4 themed designed by artist Adi Granov, and some extra skill points to unlock in-game abilities faster.Spider-Man is sure to be another big seller on PS4. We’ll no doubt get more details in the following months (especially during E3) so stay tuned for more. In the meantime, make sure to check out Game Informer, who will be posting stories and interviews with the Insomniac team all month long.center_img Stay on targetlast_img read more

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