September, 2019 Archive

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3 notes from Urban Meyers Monday press conference

Redshirt senior wide receiver Corey Smith (84) goes up for a catch against Indiana on Oct. 3 in Bloomington, Indiana. OSU won 34-27. Credit: Samantha Hollingshead / Photo EditorOn Monday following Ohio State’s 34-27 win in Bloomington, Indiana, OSU coach Urban Meyer addressed the media to discuss thoughts about the Indiana game and where his team stands heading into its Week 6 matchup against Maryland.Here are three topics that were covered by the coach.InjuriesDuring the second half against Indiana, redshirt wide receiver Corey Smith was carted off the field with a leg injury suffered when a pile of players rolled up on him.It was alluded to after the game that the Akron native was out for the year. On Monday, Meyer confirmed it.“My heart bleeds for that guy, and so do the rest of our team,” Meyer said.Smith had 20 catches for 255 yards in 2014 and this year had five grabs for 62 yards. He also played a key role on the coverage side of special teams due to his downfield speed.Meyer said Smith suffered a “similar injury to Noah Brown,” who was lost for the season with a broken leg during practice before OSU’s first game.However, Meyer said it is a possibility that Smith’s time in college might not be up as a medical redshirt is a possibility to bring him back for a sixth year.“From what I understand there’s a chance we can get one more year back,” Meyer said. “We’re going to see what happens.”Meyer also said that sophomore H-back Curtis Samuel, who did not have any touches in Saturday’s game, was limited in practice all week with back spasms but is doing better, and redshirt freshman wide receiver Parris Campbell should return to action against Maryland after missing two games with a leg injury.Areas of focusWhile OSU topped the Hoosiers to stay undefeated and top-ranked in the nation, Meyer said there are two ongoing areas of concern that plague the team: red-zone offense and turnovers.Meyer called them “two areas of strength in the past” that “are not strengths right now.”The Buckeyes had three turnovers against Indiana — two fumbles lost by redshirt sophomore H-back Jalin Marshall and an interception by redshirt junior quarterback Cardale Jones.The Buckeyes have committed 13 turnovers so far this year: seven interceptions and six lost fumbles. Their minus-four turnover margin is 101st in the country.OSU’s red-zone scoring rate of 75 percent ranks 108th in the nation. In 16 trips to the red zone, the Buckeyes have scored six touchdowns, hit six field goals and have come up empty four times. None of the six touchdowns were of the passing variety.Meyer said a discussion has happened about using a two-quarterback system with redshirt sophomore J.T. Barrett stepping in for Jones inside the 20-yard line, but no decision has been made.Assessing BraxtonRedshirt senior Braxton Miller did not factor in much on Saturday’s box score, but Meyer felt happy enough with the H-back’s performance to designate him a “champion” from the game.Miller had one run for 14 yards, and caught the first pass of the game for a large loss of nine yards. He was also flagged for a chop block that took away a touchdown.“He deserves touches,” Meyer said. “He’s an electric player with the ball in his hand. We just have not got him loose the last couple of games.”Meyer praised Miller’s perimeter blocking against Indiana, and pointed out that while Miller graded out as a champion on Saturday, he did not in the opener at Virginia Tech despite producing 140 yards of offense and two touchdowns. read more

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Ohio State revamps athletic academic logos

Ohio State released a new athletic logo to the public Monday, the same day it approved the use of the non-rounded in Block “O” in its academic logo. After a Board of Trustees vote Friday, the Block “O” will also take the place of the round “O” on OSU’s university seal, which is mostly seen on diplomas and official university documents. Jacquie Aberegg, assistant vice president of OSU marketing, told the Cleveland Plain Dealer that school officials started working on updating the seal about two years ago. The end result was all part of OSU’s mission to give the school one notable identity that gives it the best representation of academics and athletics. “We engaged hundreds of students, alumni, faculty, staff and parents through the course of this project and looked for a visual cue,” Aberegg told the Plain Dealer. “We learned that there is a common link – that the symbol is symbolic of all of those things, the breadth and depth of the academic program and the connection to the athletics. The Block “O” is the best of our history and will help us into the future.” School officials told the Plain Dealer that changes to these university symbols will be put into effect over the next few years during which time current material, like stationary, is used up. Officials told the paper that the new logo will be applied online, to documents and on buildings, but more permanent items will not be replaced. While the Block “O” has been OSU athletic department’s logo for decades, the words “Ohio State” on the department’s symbol will be all black instead of black and white now. The academic logo has been changed to a Block “O” with the words “The Ohio State University” to the right of it. No changes were made to the OSU Alumni Association’s logo of a Block “O” with a Buckeye leaf over top of it. read more

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Womens basketball Ohio State coach Kevin McGuff faces off against former mentor

“I couldn’t say enough positive things about what that was like when I had a chance to work with her,” McGuff said. “Fantastic person, great coach, been a great friend of our family for a long time. Tough to go against people you care about but it’ll be an exciting game and a great opportunity for us.”McGraw has been the head coach of the Irish for 30 years. She is a seasoned veteran of tournament play, with seven trips to the Sweet 16 and two to the Final Four under her belt. McGraw has led her program to four runner-up seasons and one national championship.McGuff first met McGraw when he interviewed at Notre Dame after one season of assistant coaching at Miami of Ohio.“I was fortunate enough to get the job,” McGuff said. “That was really a life-changing event for me.”In their time coaching together, the pair took their team to an NCAA tournament appearance every year and a national championship in 2001. To this day, it is the only national championship either coach has won.McGuff stayed with the Irish until he accepted a head coaching position at Xavier in 2002. McGuff said that McGraw prepared him for the next level and taught him how to run a winning program.“She (runs a program) as well as anybody in the country,” McGuff said. “Just the organization, the structure of how things work. How to treat people well and what you get in return. She was great to work for. Had high expectations, which is an environment that I wanted to work in, but also will allow her assistants to do their jobs and really impact the program.”In addition to this, McGuff met his wife while they were both on the coaching staff at Notre Dame.“She’ll be pulling for us,” McGuff said. “Obviously that program means a lot to her as well, but she’ll certainly be pulling for us.”This season, Notre Dame and OSU are each playing their best basketball at the right time. No. 5 OSU advanced to the Sweet 16 after topping No. 4 seed Kentucky, while the No. 1 Irish defeated No. 9 Purdue, 88-82 in overtime.“They’re a great team,” said redshirt junior Linnae Harper. “Been great for years, have a great program, a great coach. Now it’s just about us focusing on ourselves. Preparation for that game, attention to detail, just doing the little things.”Last season, the Buckeyes made it to the Sweet 16, where they fell short against Tennessee, 78-62. But this year, the team is more experienced and eager to advance.“We’re deeper, we’re more experienced, we’re just better,” McGuff said.  “Last year, I thought the kids did a great job … we found a way to end on a pretty high note. We didn’t play well in the Sweet 16, but we ran into a really good Tennessee team. But I think we’re in a much different place this year. I like where we are and I like the opportunity that’s in front of us.” OSU coach Kevin McGuff during a game against Nebraska on Feb. 18, 2016 at the Schottenstein Center. Credit: Lantern file photoWhen the Ohio State women’s basketball team takes on No. 1 seed Notre Dame this Friday, Buckeye coach Kevin McGuff will see a familiar face across the court. Notre Dame coach Muffet McGraw served as a mentor to McGuff, who was an assistant under the Fighting Irish coach for six years. read more

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Max Whitlock to turn off ITV broadcasts as I Am Team GB

first_imgTeam GB hockey captain Kate Richardson-Walsh, who steered her women’s team to gold in Rio, will also be among those cheering on sporting newcomers.The 36-year-old said: “As a group of athletes, whether medallists or not, I think Team GB have opportunity to see sports they have maybe never seen before.”There was such a breadth of of over in Rio. Our team has had so many lovely messages from people who have never watched hockey before but they watched the final, they saw the penalty shuffles and they saw how exciting a game it was and how fast it was and they have gone out to have a go. Team GB hockey heroes “That’s what we want people to do, but it doesn’t have to be hockey. Any sport would be good. Just go out there and do something. Be active.”Much of the Olympics’ success was down to the funding of athletes from more than £80million raised each year by National Lottery players.To celebrate Team GB’s record haul of 67 medals, Lotto will create an extra 67 life-changing prizes this Saturday, with 27 prizes of £1million to match our 27 gold medals.There will also be 23 prizes of £100,000, to equal tally of silver medals, extra prizes of £50,000 to 3 extra ual our and 17 to mark our bronze medals.To take part in the events across the country, visit iamteamgb.com. His double gold medal glory at Rio 2016 attracted one of the biggest audiences of the broadcasting year, yet gymnast Max Whitlock will become a TV turn off on Saturday in a bid to get people off their sofas.Whitlock, whose triumphs in Brazil were watched by more than 10 million Britons, will flick the switch off on all ITV channels for an hour as part of a nationwide sports day celebrating the UK’s biggest Olympic medal haul in 108 years.Dozens of medallists will join the public for I Am Team GB, an event which sees 2,400 venues throw open their doors to encourage the public to get more active. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Viewers tuning in to ITV from 9.30am will be greeted with the message “we’ve gone running,— why don’t you join us?” as sports clubs across the country open their doors for free tuition.Whitlock, 23, will turn off the channel after telling viewers: “Okay, to get involved today just go to iamteamgb.com to see what’s happening near you…we’ll be back in an hour.”It is hoped hundreds of thousands of Britons young and old will take part, cheered on by stars including Whitlock, gold medalist rower Helen Glover, swimming silver medalist Jazz Carlin and Charlotte Dujardin, the equestrian gold medalist.Whitlock, who is due to get married this year, said: “I first started gymnastics in Hemel Hempstead at Sapphire School of Gymnastics.Knowing how friendly and life-changing clubs like this can be, I’d urge everyone to get involved.”The event, organised by the National Lottery and ITV, will the broadcaster’s favourite soaps getting in one the act. Emmerdale will host races on its main street while Coronation Street will have games of badminton on its famous cobbles. Team GB hockey heroesCredit:Julian Simmondslast_img read more

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Royal Marine reservist faces jail after he tried to sell guns and ammunition to

first_imgThe defendant had brought with him ammunition, grenades and pyrotechnic munitions which he sold for £5,000.He also agreed to lend him a Diemaco assault rifle and Sig-sauer P226 handgun for an extra £5,000, handing them over with a sawn-off shotgun.Shannon told the officer the stash was “military grade” and the grenades were “big stuff”. One of the guns was loaded when the defendant showed it to the officer, the court heard.Shannon told the officer the deal was about “him wanting to make some money”. He described himself as “old school”, “old fashioned” and “loyal”, and was “happy to be part of a team”. He admitted all the charges including transferring a prohibited weapon, having explosives, possession of ammunition, transferring prohibited ammunition and possession of a firearm without a certificate. A statue representing the scales of justice on the roof of the Old Bailey courts in central LondonCredit:REUTERS/Toby Melville He also showed the officer how to load and unload a weapon, the court heard.After the meeting, he was tracked to a supermarket in Winnall, near Winchester, where officers moved to arrest him safely.A search of his home uncovered 500 rounds of ammunition and a stick of plastic explosive. Some of the bullets were hidden inside a Kenco coffee jar.Following his arrest, Shannon was asked if he had any issues and he said it would “all come out in the wash”, the court heard.In an interview, Shannon explained how he had picked up and kept the guns which were meant for use in the training range.The self-confessed “hoarder” said he had stored them in watertight containers he buried in the New Forest.Shannon admitted there was another weapon buried in a hide and took officers to the spot.Specialist officers later discovered a bolt-action shotgun buried near to a train track. A Royal Marine reservist is facing years in jail after being caught in an undercover sting trying to sell guns and ammunition to “Great Train Robber-types”.Over four years, Martin Shannon, of Hythe, Southampton, took guns, ammunition, explosives and grenades from his base in Poole and buried them in hides in the New Forest.The 43-year-old was snared by a National Crime Agency undercover officer who handed him £10,000 for the sale or loan of ammunition and guns at a meeting in a pub car park near Newbury.Following his arrest, Shannon told officers that he had thought to make money selling the guns to “Great Train Robber-types” who would open safes in a “cloak and dagger” style before “running off into the sunset”.The cash-strapped defendant was suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder at the time and pleaded guilty to 15 offences at the Old Bailey.center_img Ahead of his sentencing, Judge Richard Marks QC told him that whatever his motives were, once he had handed over the guns, they were out of his control.The Ministry of Defence had launched its own inquiry after supplies went missing from the Poole base where Shannon was stationed over a period of four years.Shannon had joined as a Royal Marines reservist in 1996 and was also a commercial diver and HG driver.He was questioned by the MoD investigators after an assault rifle and self loading pistol went missing from the base in October 2012 but he denied involvement.On the evening of September 1, Shannon had met the NCA undercover officer in the Chieveley area of Newbury. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. A statue representing the scales of justice on the roof of the Old Bailey courts in central Londonlast_img read more

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Proof that nagging does not work study shows being positive is better

first_imgIn centuries past deterrents against nagging ranged from the notorious scold’s bridle to the ducking stool.But now a psychological study has come up with what could be a much more powerful means of preventing nagging – evidence that it just does not work.Research commissioned by the insurer Zurich UK into what motivates people to save money found that having a positive personal goal was a more powerful motivation than simply knowing it was important.It found a marked divide between how people responded when asked what they ought to put money aside for and what, if anything, they actually were saving for. One of the options in the survey was saving to buy a houseCredit:David Cheskin/PA Unsurprisingly, given that it would not apply to all of the respondents, weddings were least common reason for saving but had stronger emotional appeal for those who did choose it.The participants were then asked whether they were already saving for some of the 10 goals and if so roughly what proportion of their income they set aside.This time the results were almost the opposite.Among those who were actively saving for something, the more emotional goals came out on top – both in terms of people’s reaction speed and the amount they said they were saving.Caring for an elderly relative came top on this measure, with both the biggest emotional draw and by far the biggest cash behind it, with those who chose it putting aside more than a quarter of their income.Having children was ranked second, just ahead of “going travelling”, which had noticeably more emotional appeal than saving for a standard holiday among those actively saving.Meanwhile big financial goals such as buying or renovating a house, although judged among the most important causes among the overall sample, came close to the bottom among those actually saving for a particular purpose.The researchers concluded that, while the head might appear to rule when people were asked what they ought to do, the heart was more decisive in determining what they do in practice.  Duncan Smith, Managing Director, MindLab, said: “Zurich asked us to test people’s implicit associations with savings goals so they can delve far deeper into what drives saving behaviour.“It provides insight into non-conscious processing in the brain, allowing us to measure the emotional value we attribute to different goals.“Exploring the ‘heart’ as well as the ‘head’ in this way gives us better insight into savings behaviour because it is emotions that power decision-making.  “What’s clear is that goal-setting does increase the amount people save, and that some goals are more effective than others, but it’s those ‘emotional’ goals – saving to care for elderly relatives or for retirement – that come out as the most important from both a head and heart perspective.”Anne Torry, Head of Zurich UK Life, added: “Our research demonstrates that thinking about what you aspire to and having goals for the immediate and long term will inspire people not only to save, but save more.“This is why it is so critical to take time out, and visualise your future so that you can then take action to financially prepare and realise your ambitions.” Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Our research demonstrates that thinking about what you aspire to and having goals for the immediate and long term will inspire people not only to save, but save moreAnne Torry, Head of Zurich UK Life They were given dozens of mini dilemmas, each involving a straight choice between the different options and asked to give an instant answer.Their responses were then analysed not only by how often the different options were chosen but also how quickly the participants chose them in each case.That enabled the researchers not only to rank the different options in terms of importance but also to see which had the strongest emotional appeal, based on their reaction times.Overall retirement was ranked as the most popular reason to save money, chosen in almost 70 per cent of the different scenarios in which it was an option. It also ranked highly for emotional appeal based on how quickly people chose it whenever it came up in one of the dilemmas.Holidays had the most emotional appeal, based on reaction time, but were ranked fourth in terms of importance behind buying a house and home improvements.Saving to support children was ranked just behind holidays in order of importance but close to the bottom for emotional appeal.center_img Holiday on a beach Saving to fund a holiday was an emotional motivatorCredit:Lauren Hurley /PA Estate agent When asked about what they should save for, people’s answers appeared to be governed by the head.But when the behaviour of those who said they were actively saving money for a particular goal was analysed the answers were noticeably governed by the heart.  The study found that the more a particular goal resonated with someone at an emotional level, not only were they more likely to save up for it but also more likely to save a larger amount.The findings could be applied to other seemingly unattractive chores such as DIY or cutting the grass.Psychologists working for the research group Mindlab devised a test to work out whether people were more likely to be motivated to save money by their head or the heart.A group of 900 people were recruited to carry out a simple online test involving choosing between 10 possible reasons for saving, from buying a house or planning a wedding to going on holiday.last_img read more

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Journalist reportedly fined £200 for using phone at wheel while travelling to

first_imgGiving anything up for #Lent? How about handheld phones at the wheel? (Except you have to ditch that bad habit permanently) #MobileBan— Transport for Bucks (@tfbalerts) March 1, 2017 “At one point I overheard a policeman saying that the lady he had just ‘done’ was a member of the press on her way to this very event. I certainly didn’t recognise her, neither did my colleagues.”Thames Valley Police told the Telegraph: “Thames Valley Police did a mobile phone check this morning where several members of the media were invited. This was at Ock St, Abingdon.”We stopped 16 people in total ( 5 for not wearing a seatbelt and 11 for using their mobile phones while driving including 2 new drivers)”It is not our policy to confirm occupations of people stopped.”The Telegraph has reached out to 5 News and Mr Reynolds for more information.The crackdown on using mobile phones at the wheel began on the 1st March, and it seems some have already faced the penalty. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. The bells of midnight have tolled. Using your mobile phone while driving will now get you 6 points and a £200 fine.Please don’t. 📵— MPS Specials (@MPSSpecials) March 1, 2017 The Department for Transport has said around 3,600 drivers were given penalties during the last co-ordinated enforcement week between 23-29 January.Transport Secretary Chris Grayling said: “It may seem innocent, but holding and using your phone at the wheel risks serious injury and even death to yourself and other road users.”Doubling penalties will act as a strong deterrent to motorists tempted to pick up their phone while driving and will also mean repeat offenders could find themselves banned from our roads if they are caught twice.” Many thought the tweet seemed too good to be true, but the news channel has confirmed it happened in a post on its Facebook page.Mr Reynolds also replied to naysayers on Twitter, writing that it did indeed happen.Freelance reporter Steve Cottrell was also at the scene, and told The Telegraph what happened.He said he witnessed the event while filming for ITV news.center_img He explained: “The police were pulling people off the A415 Ock Street using plain-clothed Police spotters to indicate to uniformed officers further down the road (where we were). The specific offence being targeted was mobile phone use while driving. There were plenty caught, and as the photographers and cameramen (me, BBC Oxford and Channel 5 News) filmed them, various reporters asked for comments from the drivers, and variously some responded, most didn’t. From the 1st March, drivers using their phones at the wheel will be doubly penalised; being fined £200 and have six points put on their license.Journalists, keen to explain the situation to viewers and readers, set off to cover the new rules at a Thames Valley Police organised press event in Abingdon, Oxfordshire on Wednesday morning.However, one allegedly got caught using their phone while at the wheel, and faced the new penalty while on the way to cover it.Eagle-eyed journalist Dominic Reynolds from 5 News took a photograph of the incident, writing on Twitter: “Breaking Irony News: a journalist driving here to cover phone/driving crackdown has just been busted: £200, 6pts”. Breaking Irony News: a journalist driving here to cover phone/driving crackdown has just been busted: £200, 6pts. pic.twitter.com/8d0GiyjOp0— Dominic Reynolds (@domreynolds) March 1, 2017 Motorists caught using a phone at the wheel face losing their license if using their mobile telephone within 2 years of passing their test.Additionally, the police have begun a seven-day crackdown, featuring extra patrols and an “increased focus” on stopping people using their phones while driving.last_img read more

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RSPCA has not moved on since the Seventies says former director

first_img“The RSPCA is essentially a great organisation, fantastic staff work incredibly hard, but you have to come to a point where you have to say enough is enough and I can’t any longer support the way this is happening.” The RSPCA is not “fit for purpose” according to the charity’s former directorCredit:Frank Naylor / Alamy  The RSPCA is “not fit for purpose”, a former director of the animal charity has claimed.Steve Carter, who left his role as director of RSPCA Wales in 2015, said he believed the structure of the organisation had not “moved on much since the 1970s”.His remarks came after the Charity Commission said the RSPCA’s governance was below the standard it would expect for a “modern charity”.In June, RSPCA chief executive Jeremy Cooper departed after just a year in the role, and the organisation was told it could face “further regulatory action” if it did not make improvements.The charity did not have a chief executive between 2014 and 2016 and instead two unpaid trustees took the helm.Mr Carter told the BBC’s Panorama programme: “I personally think that the RSPCA currently is not fit for purpose. I think it stems from the background of council.”I don’t think the governance process and structure has moved on much since the 1970s.”Chris Laurence, a former chief vet at the RSPCA who resigned as a trustee last year, added: “I had real concerns about the way the RSPCA was being run at council level. In response to Panorama, the RSPCA said it had published an independent review into its governance which said some improvement was required.A spokesman for the charity said: “We aren’t complacent about these issues, and we are committed to continually improving everything we do as an organisation.”The programme makers also spoke to people who had been prosecuted by the RSPCA, including a bird keeper who said he felt the charity “bullied” him.Steve Rainton and his partner Natalie Holden, from Sussex, were taken to court by the RSPCA but were cleared of two animal welfare offences, while another 14 charges were dismissed, according to the BBC.Mr Rainton told the programme: “I felt bullied by the RSPCA. They used my partner. They basically said they would drop all charges against my partner if I took the rap basically.”The RSPCA said it had taken the decision to prosecute Mr Rainton and Ms Holden “because there was sufficient evidence and it was in the public interest”.”Unfortunately the police inadvertently breached procedures under the Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984, which resulted in much of the evidence being excluded at trial,” the charity said.”The result of the trial does not have any bearing on the conduct of the RSPCA, which acted properly and lawfully throughout this investigation and in the best interest of the animals concerned.”center_img The RSPCA is not "fit for purpose" according to the charity's former director Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

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Python found lurking in Essex toilet

first_img“He was frantic, and shaking, and I could tell something was wrong, but that was not what I expected,” she said.”I had to use a broom handle to lift the lid, then out popped its head and its tongue came out as well.”Mrs Cowell telephoned several companies asking for help until specialists from Scales and Fangs, a local pet store, came to her aid. But when he arrived at the house, he found the young python, which was “clearly someone’s pet that had escaped into the toilet system”.”It was in quite good health,” he added, “but it unfortunately had a bit of a skin problem as its skin had been covered in bleach.”The family were scared of course, but I told them that the snake was completely harmless”.Mr Yeldham said that Scales and Fangs plans to look after the baby python until its scale rot is cured, and if no one comes forward for their pet the snake will be put up for adoption.It’s the first time in ten years of business that they’ve seen a snake in a bathroom, he added. “Normally we find about one or two in the garden each year, and last summer we found a corn snake in a family’s living room, but there’s never been one in a toilet.” Credit: Laura Cowell The snake When a five-year-old boy went to use the toilet at his home in Southend, Essex, he found a three-foot-long python concealed under the toilet lid.The specialists who rescued the snake have surmised that it was probably a local family’s pet that had gone down their toilet and made its way through the connecting sewers to another house’s bathroom.Laura Cowell, the boy’s mother, said that she was “petrified” after the incident, and placed weights on the toilet lid in that bathroom for a few days after the snake had been removed.Before she knew about the snake, Mrs Cowell had noticed that the toilet seemed blocked and the water wasn’t  draining properly. But she only found the cause when her son went to the bathroom on Wednesday and was shocked to discover the baby royal python lying hidden inside the toilet. Rob Yeldham, the shop’s owner, was expecting to find a native grass snake when he got the call from Mrs Cowell, and brought along gloves and a hook to release it  back into the wild.  Laura Cowell The snakeCredit:Laura Cowell Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

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Prince William launches poetry competition to find a Wilfred Owen for new generation

first_imgOnce heard, the haunting words of Wilfred Owen and his First World War contemporaries can never be forgotten, capturing all the heroism, trauma and tragedy their generation endured.A century on, the Duke of Cambridge is leading the search for a talented poet for a new era, inviting them to write their “modern-day perspective on service, conflict and humankind’s ability to overcome adversity”.The Duke, who said he never fails to be moved by the “sentiments invoked by the brave, young soldiers” of the First World War, has launched a national poetry competition to immortalise the sacrifices of 21st century servicemen and women, promising to read out the winning entry himself.The poetry competition marks both the 100th anniversary of the end of the First World War and the opening of the Defence and National Rehabilitation Centre (DNRC): a world-leading clinical rehabilitation centre for the Armed Forces.Called A Poem To Remember, it is intended to honour and convey the challenges faced by current serving men and women, and their families. Dan Snow, the historian and broadcaster, will chair a judging panel The Duke of Cambridge will read the winning poemCredit:PA Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. “I am greatly looking forward to reading the winning entry.”The best poem will be chosen by the public from a shortlist of five, and be read by the Duke of Cambridge, the Patron of the DNRC campaign, at a special event at the new defence facility this summer.  It will also be mounted at the DNRC, with its author receiving a £2,000 cash prize.The DNRC, which is funded by charitable donations, will succeed Headley Court as the UK’s leading facility for the clinical rehabilitation of sick and injured members of the Armed Forces later this year. Wilfred Owen, the war poet Wilfred Owen, the war poet “Many of the memories of that conflict, and our understanding of it, have been shaped by the remarkable works of poetry written by those caught up in that struggle.“I, like countless other readers over the decades since the war, have always been moved by sentiments invoked by the brave, young soldiers.“That is why – as Patron of the appeal to build the Defence National Rehabilitation Centre – I am delighted to help launch this competition to find a new poem that, inspired by those earlier works, will have its own modern-day perspective on service, conflict and humankind’s ability to overcome adversity. The competition is supported by the Poetry Society, Poet in the City, the War Poets Association, the Wilfred Owen Association, ABF The Soldiers’ Charity, Help for Heroes, the Royal Air Force Benevolent Fund, Style for Soldiers, and Walking with the Wounded. The new centre is being built, due to open later this year Prince Harry and Prince William visit Headley Court in 2008 Prince Harry and Prince William visit Headley Court in 2008Credit:PA The new centre is being built, due to open later this year “The First World War poets are still held in deep regard, and it seems very appropriate to launch a competition that can both remind us of their great work and their sacrifice, while helping us contemplate the service and sacrifice that the current generation and their families have given.”Levison Wood, former British army officer and ambassador for Walking with the Wounded added: “I think it’s very important that we never forget the sacrifices made by British and Commonwealth servicemen and women and poetry is a wonderful way of immortalising the legacy of that great generation, whilst remembering that today’s soldiers have their own challenges to face.”The competition is now open, with a deadline for entries on April 9th. Ahead of the competition’s launch on Friday, the Duke of Cambridge said: “The centenary year of the end of the First World War is a very appropriate year to be launching a national poetry prize. Dan Snow, the historian and broadcaster, will chair a judging panelCredit:Rii Schroer The state-of-the-art facility, which will be run by the Ministry of Defence, is situated near Loughborough and is designed to provide neurological and complex trauma care, and a full suite of rehabilitative facilities, together on one site.The Duke of Cambridge and his brother Prince Harry were both major supporters of Headley Court, photographed there speaking to those undergoing rehabilitation on numerous occasions. The building project was initiated by the late 6th Duke of Westminster, who had a distinguished 40 year service in the British Reserve Army and is said to have cared deeply about the treatment provided for those who volunteer for their country. The 6th Duke of Westminster, who died in 2016, and his friend Prince Charles Patients being treated at the centre, which has been running for 70 years, will be phased over to DNRC once it is up and running this summer.The poetry competition is open to anybody aged 17 and over, and requires writers to submit unpublished work no more than 25 lines long.Entries will be whittled down to a longlist of 25, before the best five are selected by a panel of judges chaired by historian and broadcaster Dan Snow and including SAS veteran and bestselling novelist Andy McNab. The winner will then be decided by public vote. Duke of Cambridge Will Greenwood, England rugby player and  supporter of Walking With The Wounded, a charity that is backing A Poem to Remember, said: “It is so important that we don’t forget our injured troops.  “The new Defence National Rehabilitation Centre will be a powerful signal that the country is committed to providing the best possible care for our wounded service personnel. The 6th Duke of Westminster, who died in 2016, and his friend Prince Charleslast_img read more

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