July, 2019 Archive

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Labour needs to do far more to address issues of d

first_imgLabour needs to do far more to address issues of disability rights and the inclusion of disabled people in society, two leading disabled academics have told a fringe meeting at the party’s annual conference.Disability rights issues were marginalised at this week’s conference, with only fleeting references to the social care crisis – including a pledge to integrate the health and social care systems – and any attention focusing only on mental health, social security and jobs.But Miro Griffiths, a researcher and teacher at John Moores University, which hosted Monday’s fringe meeting, said the party needed to examine its position on disability rights and inclusion, and ask “what does it actually mean to be included in society, to be included in our communities”.He said: “It needs to be led at the top by the likes of Jeremy Corbyn, using the language and embracing the principles disabled people and their organisations have spoken of for many years.”Griffiths and Dr Paul Darke, cultural critic and director of the organisation Outside Centre, decided to hold the event because of the failure to address the issues on the conference platform and through meetings on the conference fringe.Griffiths suggested that disabled people needed organisations like Momentum, the left-wing campaign set up to build on and support Corbyn’s leadership of the party, to start “opening up and being accessible to disabled people”.And he said the party needed to listen to disabled people and their user-led organisations.Darke told Labour MP Margaret Greenwood – who attended the fringe event along with shadow disabled people’s minister Debbie Abrahams – that he believed the party should appoint between 10 and 15 disabled peers who were politically and socially aware and “whose voices cannot be ignored”.Griffiths, a former project officer for the European Network on Independent Living (ENIL), said that Corbyn had the potential for “taking Labour in a new direction” and winning the support of an “untapped demographic” who have previously been non-voters “and have not been given the skills to question the marginalisation they experience”.That potential was laid out in a disability rights manifesto produced by Corbyn’s team as part of his re-election campaign, although it has not been widely circulated and is not yet Labour policy, while most of its content was ignored by the conference.Among its pledges, Corbyn’s manifesto commits to the full implementation of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, ensuring that the 12 pillars of independent living inform Labour policy-making, and developing an inclusive education system.Dave Allan, chair of Disability Labour – the network of disabled Labour party members – pointed out this week that issues of disability rights should be addressed more fully at next year’s conference, when Corbyn should have been able to fill all of his shadow ministerial posts, many of which had to be merged after he faced the string of resignations that led to him facing a leadership election.Because of those forced changes, there is currently no shadow minister for disabled people and no shadow minister for mental health, a new position Corbyn himself created.After the fringe event – which they called Disability, Social Justice and Control – Darke said that he and Griffiths had organised the meeting themselves because the issues were not being addressed at conference.He said: “If you work in a big company, you get disability equality training, but I bet the MPs don’t.“[They don’t understand] the political articulation of what disability is. They are almost incapable of escaping the notion of linking it to charity, and that is a real tragedy, a real problem with our progression.“It should be compulsory for MPs to a do a certain number of disability things at every conference, within the main conference and on the fringe.“It’s not necessarily the MPs’ fault, it’s why they need to be trained and educated. It is the party’s responsibility to ensure that it happens.”Griffiths said Labour “has not built on the important legacy that was being built by grassroots movements like Disabled People Against Cuts (DPAC)”.He said: “Jeremy has to acknowledge the failure of the Labour party in previous years to push forward with these agendas.”And he said Corbyn needed to be clear that engaging with disabled people did not mean talking to “the usual suspects” from the big disability charities, but listening to groups like DPAC and the anti-euthanasia network Not Dead Yet UK.Griffiths also called for the party to move away from the focus on vulnerability and the “tragedy” of disabled people’s lives, and instead create a foundation of human rights and social justice, allowing Corbyn to say that “this is what socialism means”.Picture: Miro Griffiths (centre) and Dr Paul Darke being interviewed by DNS editor John Pring. Photograph by Claire Darkelast_img read more

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Photo essay Everyday people

first_img Photo by Kathleen Narruhn Photo by Kathleen Narruhn Photo by Kathleen Narruhn Photo by Kathleen Narruhn 0% Photo by Kathleen Narruhn Photo by Kathleen Narruhn People of the Mission just going about their day. Photo by Kathleen Narruhn Photo by Kathleen Narruhn Photo by Kathleen Narruhn Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0% Photo by Kathleen Narruhnlast_img

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SF police officials greenlight Tasers after long and rowdy meeting

first_imgThe vote was delayed for more than an hour after one activist refused to relinquish the mic during public comment, bringing the hearing to a standstill — albeit a rowdy one. Later, in a smaller room two floors up, commissioners endured relentless admonitions for abruptly shutting down and relocating the meeting.Though the oversight body gave the weapon the thumbs up, it ruled that it cannot be deployed until Dec. 2018, when new use-of-force policies will have been in effect for two years.“I truly hope and pray we never have to use these devices — that de-escalation works,” said Commissioner Thomas Mazzucco, an appointee of former Mayor Gavin Newsom. “The reality is, I’d like to see these devices used in that rare circumstance when the only thing left is to use a firearm.”Mazzucco was joined in the “aye” column by Mayor Ed Lee appointees Sonia Melara and Robert Hirsch, and Newsom pick Joe Marshall.Opposing them were the three Board of Supervisors appointees: Commission president Julius Turman, Petra DeJesus and Bill Ong Hing.While none of the votes were a surprise, opponents had hoped to sway Hirsch. Instead, those in favor of Tasers managed to accommodate his view that more time was needed, by delaying the implementation of Tasers for more than a year. For the “no” contingent, a year’s delay was not enough. “We are in the middle of moving this process, moving this department in a more positive direction,” said Turman, who repeatedly lost his patience throughout the seven-hour meeting as he attempted to settle a disruptive, overwhelmingly anti-Taser crowd. He went on to say that use-of-force techniques are working within the force, and that use of force among SF officers has been declining. Police Commission President Julius Turman sided with the overwhelmingly anti-Taser crowd at Friday night’s meeting, despite frequently reprimanding attendees for disruptive behavior. Photo by Sam GoldmanPublic comment and the commissioners’ questions for experts were nearly drowned out, at times, by chanting from the hallway by attendees furious at the restrictions Turman placed on the latter half of the meeting. The president allowed the steady stream of attendees to continue speaking, but officers at the door of Room 400 admitted only five in at a time for their two-minute remarks at the microphone. The meeting’s resumption on the fourth floor — before a crowd of mostly journalists and cameras — came more than an hour after 67-year-old activist Maria Cristina Gutierrez refused to concede the lectern. Gutierrez was one of the Frisco 5, the group that staged a hunger strike in the Mission District last year that helped unseat Police Chief Greg Suhr.She pressed on with her protest, despite Turman’s demands for the next speaker. The powder keg blew with loud chants of “let her talk!”“This is the people’s council!” activist Magick Altman yelled over the tumult. “If these people [the commissioners] won’t represent us, we’ll be the deciders!” By the time another speaker took over for Gutierrez, the commissioners had retreated to a back room. An hour later, the halls of the top floor of City Hall rang with chants of “let us in!” and “show your face!” The new set-up didn’t sit well with Commissioner Petra DeJesus.“Commissioner Turman, if I can implore you,” she said. “We have empty seats — ”“No,” he interrupted.DeJesus, on crutches and in a medical walking boot, left the new dais to join speakers waiting in the hall. Right before the vote, she slammed her colleagues for considering Tasers.“I think this commission has turned their deaf ears to the communities that are most affected by this,” she said.The overwhelmingly anti-Taser crowd added their disgust at the meeting shake-up to their pleading that commissioners reject the device.“I am absolutely shocked,” one woman said. “You should all be ashamed of yourselves.”At one point Turman, visibly impatient since the intermission, let loose.“Do you think we don’t take this seriously?” he asked, lifting a hefty binder of Taser materials over his head. The commission president said he didn’t want to hear the profanity lacing some of the comments, “or have my blackness or my gayness questioned.” “I just need to hear the information and make a decision,” he said.In a now-common refrain for police higher-ups, Chief Bill Scott emphasized Tasers’ adoption would be accompanied by robust accountability measures and that his department prioritizes de-escalation tactics. “The reality is that there are times that de-escalation does not work, and officers have to use force as safely as possible,” he said at the meeting’s outset. The often-acrimonious debate is nothing new for the liberal city with a police force that has been described an “old boys’ club.” Once in 2004 and twice in 2010, the commission shied away from greenlighting what are more formally called “conducted energy devices.”Proponents argue Tasers are a less-lethal option for subduing a combative person, saving the lives of both suspects and officers. The swarm of attendees begged to differ, asserting that the stun guns are still lethal, especially for those on drugs or with certain medical conditions, and are used disproportionately against people of color. Critics pointed to studies showing some 50 percent of Taser deployments fail to make the targets comply. According to Mike Leonesio, a Taser consultant who established Oakland’s Taser program, the effectiveness of a newer model the department has its eye is still wholly unknown.“I have been searching and searching for more data to either confirm or deny the efficacy of these weapons, and there just isn’t any out there,” he told the commission.Another major sticking point has been the price tag: City budget officials put the cost of each device at $2,300. When other expenses are factored in — including defibrillators, device testing, Taser instructors, medical transports, data collection, and the risk of lawsuits — the cost balloons, to an estimated $2.8 million to $8 million in one-time costs.Sparking this most recent debate was a 400-page report handed down by the Department of Justice a year ago that picked apart SFPD’s policies and practices, and offered up 272 recommendations for reform. To “strongly consider deploying” Tasers was among them. Scott and his deputies have taken pains to remind residents that they’re working to implement the full spectrum of ways the feds think they could do better. Tags: police • SFPD • tasers Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0% Covering the Police is a collaboration with UC Berkeley’s Graduate School of Journalism.Months of heated debate over whether to arm San Francisco police with Tasers came to a raucous conclusion late Friday night as the city’s Police Commission voted 4-3 to approve the stun guns.The meeting’s adjournment near midnight was met with thunderous cries of “shame, shame, shame,” from a crowd of several dozen that had been left out of the meeting room.Like a powder keg, the special Police Commission meeting only required the right spark to blow up — and it did so, several times.center_img 0%last_img read more

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Trumps Apostle

first_imgHere’s Robert Jeffress, talking to the hundreds of thousands of people watching conservative cable news on a typical Friday evening, and he’s defending President Donald Trump against the latest array of accusations in the news this week. And he isn’t simply defending Trump—he’s defending him with one carefully crafted Bible-wrapped barb after another, and with more passion, more preparation, more devotion than anyone else on television. As Lou Dobbs finishes his opening remarks, Jeffress laughs and nods. It’s early January, about two weeks into what will prove to be the longest government shutdown in U.S. history. Across the country, hundreds of thousands of federal workers are missing paychecks, worrying about mortgages, car payments, utility bills. Some have started going to food banks. But Dobbs waves his hand up and down and tells Jeffress that he hasn’t heard anyone—“literally no one!”—say they miss the government. The jowly host revels in Trump’s threats that the shutdown could continue “for months, if not years,” if that’s what it takes to get more wall built on America’s border with Mexico.Jeffress, speaking from a remote studio in downtown Dallas, agrees completely. “Well, he’s doing exactly the right thing in keeping this government shut down until he gets that wall,” he says. Jeffress is the senior pastor at First Baptist Dallas, a 13,000-member megachurch that’s one of the most influential in the country, but he’s known best for appearances like this one: he’s often on Fox & Friends or Hannity or any number of sound-bitey segments on Fox News or Fox Business. His own religious show airs six days a week on the Trinity Broadcasting Network. He has a daily radio program too, broadcast on more than nine hundred Christian stations across the country, though it’s TV he loves best. Dobbs invites Jeffress onto his show nearly every week. If you fill out the first name, last name, or agree to terms fields, you will NOT be added to the newsletter list. Leave them blank to get signed up. Hope you enjoyed your free ride. To get back in the saddle, subscribe! It’s not clear whether Dobbs buys this theological reasoning, but he’s at least amused by it. “What would be the point of those pearly gates if there weren’t a wall, right?” the host says with a Cheshire grin. The pastor keeps going. “What is immoral,” he says, “is for Democrats to continue to try to block this president from performing his God-given task of protecting this nation.”The 63-year-old Jeffress is trim and winsome, with a natural smile and a syrupy demeanor. Tonight he’s wearing a charcoal suit and a gleaming magenta tie with matching pocket square. As he speaks, the screen behind him shows generic patriotic imagery. He has the syntax and enunciation of a champion debater and the certitude of someone who believes he gets his instructions directly from God.He is known for leaning into controversy, whether it’s declaring that Mormonism is “a heresy from the pit of hell” (which resulted in an extended public beef with Mitt Romney) or preaching a sermon titled “Why Gay Is Not Okay” (which resulted in a protest outside his church) or having two hundred or so members of his choir and orchestra perform a rendition of a hymn called “Make America Great Again” at a concert in Washington, D.C. (which resulted in not one but two approving tweets from President Trump).He is also known, of course, as one of the president’s most avid and outspoken advocates. While other evangelical leaders were slow to get behind Trump—James Dobson, for example, wondered about Trump’s religiosity—Jeffress campaigned with him before the 2016 primaries even started, before Ted Cruz and Jeb Bush and Marco Rubio flamed out. If some evangelicals who now back Trump fret that they’ve entered into a Faustian bargain, for Jeffress it’s a wholehearted embrace. It’s become one of the most fascinating symbiotic relationships in modern politics: the pastor gets a national platform for his message and a leader who appoints conservative judges who will in turn restrict access to abortion; the president gets the support of evangelical voters he needs to win reelection, along with an energetic and effective promoter who can explain or excuse all manner of polarizing behavior. When the Access Hollywood tape leaked before the election and America heard Trump brag about grabbing women, Jeffress went on Fox News to say that the candidate’s words were “crude, offensive, and indefensible, but they’re not enough to make me vote for Hillary Clinton.” After the president said there were “some very fine people on both sides” of the deadly clash between white nationalists and counterprotesters in Charlottesville, Virginia, Jeffress appeared on the Christian Broadcasting Network to say that Democrats were falsely painting Trump as a racist. “Racism comes in all shapes, all sizes, and, yes, all colors,” explained the pastor. “And if we’re going to denounce some racism, we ought to denounce all racism.”When the adult-film actress Stormy Daniels announced that she’d had a sexual encounter with Trump and was paid to keep quiet before the election, Jeffress explained in a Fox News debate with Juan Williams that evangelicals “knew they weren’t voting for an altar boy.” Already a subscriber? Login or link your subscription. Robert Jeffress at First Baptist Dallas on March 27, 2019.Photograph by Trevor Paulhus Although Jeffress is just a boy, people around him are already taking notice of his power to influence others. His ninth grade speech teacher tells him, “Jeffress, you’re going to be a preacher one day, and it scares the bejeebers out of me because you can sell anybody anything!” Criswell becomes his mentor, and in fact, when he’s a freshman in high school, Jeffress hears God tell him to abandon his executive producer dreams. For the first fifteen years of his career as a pastor, at a small church in Eastland and then a larger First Baptist in Wichita Falls, Jeffress doesn’t get political. He rarely mentions abortion or homosexuality. But he learns the power of controversy in 1998, when a member of his church shows him two children’s books from the local library: Heather Has Two Mommies and Daddy’s Roommate. Jeffress announces that he will not allow the books to be returned. The city council takes his side, the American Civil Liberties Union sues the city, and the story makes national headlines. Eventually a court decides the library can keep the titles in the children’s section, but by then Jeffress has received letters and donations from all over the country. Church attendance goes up, and soon comes an expensive new sanctuary. Jeffress will remember these lessons when he is invited, in 2007, to return to First Baptist Dallas as senior pastor. In his first few years back, he gives sermons with attention-grabbing titles on the marquee and makes controversial statements about, in no particular order, Mormons, Muslims, Jews, Catholics, gays, lesbians, and Oprah Winfrey. Almost a decade later, he embraces one of the most controversial presidential candidates of all time, and in 2018 the church reports the highest giving levels in its 150-year history. Now, like Criswell and Billy Graham, who was himself a longtime member of First Baptist Dallas, Jeffress has the ear of the president. Through all this, he retains his affinity for television. In 2018 his entire family is featured on a TLC reality show centered on his oldest daughter’s newborn triplets. At First Baptist, the main sanctuary gets outfitted with six or seven high-definition screens that can be made into a long LED scroll that ribbons across the back of the proscenium. Sunday services are broadcast live on the church website, an operation that includes seven cameras, a team of grips and technicians, and a control room that rivals studios at CNN and Fox. The church posts his cable news clips on YouTube. Jeffress says TV accounts for a small percentage of his work but that Fox News—where he becomes a paid contributor under contract—is a “gateway to bring people into our ministry.”Donald Trump greeting Jeffress at the Celebrate Freedom Rally in Washington, D.C., on July 1, 2017.Olivier Douliery-Pool/GettyAnd television, it turns out, is how he connects to the president, a man with his own affinity for reality shows. In mid-2015, after seeing Jeffress compliment him on Fox News, Trump tweets out the clip and has someone from his office—Jeffress doesn’t remember who—reach out so he can thank the pastor for the kind words.When Jeffress recounts the story, he lowers his voice an octave to repeat the way he’s heard Trump describe it: “ ‘You know, I was watching TV one night, and I’ll never forget, I saw Pastor Jeffress saying, ‘Trump’s a lousy Christian, but he’s a good leader. ’ ”The pastor interrupts himself to clarify. “Of course, I didn’t quite say it that way,” he explains, lest anyone think he called the president lousy. “I said, ‘He’s not a perfect person, but he’s a tremendous leader.’ ”Jeffress has also heard Trump tell it this way: “I was watching television with Melania, and I saw Pastor Jeffress, and I said, ‘Look at his mouth move! Look at how quickly that mouth moves. It’s like a machine gun! I would never want to see that used against me someday!’ ” Trump’s campaign asks Jeffress to pray at a rally in Dallas that fall, and soon the two forge what they describe as a friendship. The candidate sends nice notes or has his assistant email, and in early 2016, Trump invites Jeffress to join him on the campaign trail. The pastor spends a weekend with Trump in Iowa, where, both men understand, evangelical support can make or break a Republican presidential run. Jeffress says things like “I don’t want some meek and mild leader or somebody who’s going to turn the other cheek. I’ve said I want the meanest, toughest SOB I can find to protect this nation.” Then Jeffress is at Trump Tower on the day of the election. The mood is not optimistic. Jeffress tells Trump he hopes they’ll stay friends, no matter the outcome. Trump asks him if he thinks evangelical voters will show up for him. The pastor says he does. Later that night, Jeffress and his wife go to the Hilton to watch the results come in. For a while, it’s slow and quiet, and the couple debate leaving early. But as the evening wears on, the feeling in the room starts to change. “I will never forget when the spotlight was thrown on the balcony of the ballroom,” he recalls later, his voice slowing for dramatic effect. “The president and the first lady and their family entered to the soundtrack of the movie Air Force One. It was a chill-bumps moment.”After a speech, Trump comes down from the stage to shake a few hands. Spotting Jeffress, he walks over and puts his arm around the pastor. The boy who used to play his accordion on Mr. Peppermint is now standing next to the future president. “Did you see it?” Trump says. “Largest evangelical turnout in history!”“Yes, sir, I saw it,” Jeffress tells him. “I just wanted to be sure you saw it.”Here’s Robert Jeffress in his office, a year or so into Trump’s first term, speaking to a reporter: me. We have a bit of history. In late 2011, around the time Jeffress was first upsetting conservatives by criticizing Republican presidential front-runner Mitt Romney, I wrote a profile of Jeffress for D Magazine. In the story, I explained that despite the fact that I disagreed with him on virtually every issue—at the time, he was supporting a presidential run by Texas governor Rick Perry—I found Jeffress charming and personable. Yes, he insists that the vast majority of humanity will spend eternity in a pit of fire. But he’s also self-deprecating and disarming. I was curious about his political advocacy and how he squares it with the teachings of Jesus.After the story ran, we continued to have lunch every couple of months, usually in his office. It’s on the sixth floor of one of the church’s eight buildings, with towering shelves of scholarly journals, framed covers of his books (he has written more than twenty), and floor-to-ceiling windows that look out over the Nasher Sculpture Center. We ask each other about family and work. We discuss news and politics and whatever’s happening in the world that week.He’s completely engaged, attentive. With or without the TV makeup, he’s the same man. Same rapid-fire delivery. Same polite, saccharine manner. Same unapologetic born-again Baptist view of the world. He says he genuinely wants me to dedicate myself to Jesus Christ, and he prays for me and my wife. His goal is to save as many souls as possible before the end times. He knows journalism is important to me, and he reminds me that some of the greatest writers in history were Christians. I joke that I know he’d love to brag that he helped shape some sort of present-day C. S. Lewis.Jeffress often tells his flock that God sends us tests and trials. I want to ask Jeffress if he thinks there’s any chance Donald Trump is a test from God—and if maybe he’s failing.I’m also forthright: about my curiosity, about my dismay at the many things he says and does that have the potential to hurt so many people. He knows what I’m talking about, and he laughs and nods. We discuss my writing something about him and his friendship with the president. He likes the idea. Then he jokes, “Now, don’t pull a Michael Cohen on me!”So for months, I attend Sunday services, hang out at church events, spend hours talking politics with religious conservatives, and meet over and over with Jeffress himself. The unlikelihood of the Trump presidency has occasioned much ink and froth about the many purported reasons that white evangelicals supported him: economic and racial fears, Supreme Court picks, abortion, the fact that he wasn’t Hillary Clinton, and so on. It’s also provoked condemnation of Jeffress and his fellow Trump-supporting religious leaders for seemingly abandoning Christian principles in exchange for power—for becoming “court evangelicals,” as historian John Fea, the author of Believe Me: The Evangelical Road to Donald Trump, puts it. Fresh-faced 2020 presidential hopeful Pete Buttigieg, a gay military veteran and a Christian, likes to say that support for Trump is in tension with much of the New Testament, including, for example, the way Jesus condemns those who truckle to the strong while neglecting the poor. Closer to home, Eric Folkerth, the senior pastor at the much more liberal Woods United Methodist Church, in Grand Prairie, writes an open letter to Jeffress in May, calling him “a Pharisee of our time.”And so I press Jeffress to explain the choices he makes, to explain the things he says in front of the cameras. Jeffress has told me he was drawn to Trump’s leadership and intellect. “He’s a very smart person,” he’s said. “You don’t become a billionaire and president of the United States by being an idiot.” But none of that quite explains why a pastor goes out of his way to publicly defend the president’s every indiscretion. He could easily vote according to his views on the Supreme Court or according to his conscience on abortion without also going on TV, over and over, in front of hundreds of thousands of viewers, to explain away things like Trump’s adultery and language that inflames foreign policy. He could be in favor of immigration reform, for example, and not feel compelled to rationalize the separation of families. He could believe that God has put someone in power and still hold that person to a high moral standard.Jeffress often tells his flock that God sends us tests and trials. I want to ask Jeffress if he thinks there’s any chance Donald Trump is a test from God—and if maybe he’s failing. Here’s Robert Jeffress on a Sunday morning, surrounded by lights and cameras and flat screens the size of school buses, taking the stage with the confident stride of a talk show host. He’s looking out on an audience of roughly 1,600, with thousands more watching and listening in, delivering a sermon that’s at turns funny and thoughtful and ripe with references to pop culture and historic events and scholarly interpretations of biblical passages. Jeffress is wearing a dark suit with faint pinstripes, a red tie that glimmers under the lights, and a nearly imperceptible wireless microphone over his right cheek, and he’s nailing the timing of every joke and pausing for laughs and modulating his voice in just the right way to create connection. Today’s sermon is about “the antidote to worry,” and it unfolds like a forty-minute brimstone-scented TED talk. In the first few minutes alone, he mixes in quotes from obscure authors, anecdotes from World War II, and the etymology of the word “worry.” Sprinkled throughout are also copious references to supporting Scripture; there are more than ten, from the Old Testament and New, in the first twenty minutes. After each citation, he pauses to let his words linger. His reasoning is based on the fact that every word of the Bible is literally true.Jeffress agrees with the popular comparison evangelicals draw between President Trump and Cyrus the Great, the ancient Persian king who, according to Jewish tradition, allowed the exiled Hebrews to return to Jerusalem. Cyrus is thought of as a secular agent of God’s divine plan, and this oft-cited parallel is useful to Trump’s most enthusiastic backers as a way of explaining their support: they can champion him, they say, because there is a difference between the earthly realm and the heavenly one, between government and church. In an interview with the Washington Post, Jerry Falwell Jr. put it this way: “In the heavenly kingdom, the responsibility is to treat others as you’d like to be treated. In the earthly kingdom, the responsibility is to choose leaders who will do what’s best for your country.”But keeping your realms separate is not so clear-cut when you’re both a pundit and a pastor. Jeffress, unlike his peers, is the full-time shepherd of a flock. In the lustrous sanctuary of First Baptist—the church has multiple six-story garages and crowded escalators and feels a little like one of the theaters or music halls a few blocks away in the Arts District—Jeffress preaches two sermons nearly every Sunday. He attends luncheons and prayer meetings and Bible studies. He visits people in the hospital and performs weddings and funerals. He helped raise more than $135 million for a renovation that included a new children’s building, sky bridges, and a dancing, LED-loaded fountain. At special events, visitors are given not a Bible but a copy of one of his books. “He is so right,” one of his members, a black mother in her thirties, tells me. “It is time to stop being wimpy about Christianity. I wish more Christians had the heart for the Lord that he does.”Jeffress studiously insists that his politics and his pastorate are separate. “We don’t check green cards or passports at First Baptist Dallas,” he’s fond of saying. When he’s at the podium in church, he seldom utters a word about the president. And while some of the older men in the pews are wearing American flag and Israeli flag pins on their suits—and there’s at least one bumper sticker in the parking garage for QAnon, a far-right conspiracy theory alleging a “deep state” plot against Trump—it’s not like members are debating legislative policy in the halls. It’s more that there’s a general celebration and commingling of patriotism and piety. I recently attended services on and off for five months and never heard Jeffress mention politics explicitly in a sermon. I heard him talk about how heaven is a real place and what people do there: enjoy the relief of a job well done, share fellowship with loved ones, get to better know their Lord. Though First Baptist doesn’t keep records on its racial demographics, the congregation seems as diverse as that of any megachurch in North Texas. Affluent older white people dressed in stiff suits and flowery dresses with matching hats. Young couples, the men in jeans and tucked-in button-downs, the women in cotton dresses. A black family spanning four generations. Immigrants from Latin America and Africa and Eastern Europe and East Asia. At the other end of the building, in a separate sanctuary, hundreds more people—mostly younger—watch Jeffress on a live broadcast.About twenty minutes into his sermon about worry, Jeffress says something that makes me perk up a bit. He’s hoisting an open Bible in his left hand when his tone changes for just a moment, and he stares into the camera, his right hand gesturing to the breast of his pinstriped suit. “I can tell you from personal experience: God’s discipline is never pleasant,” he says. “There are times in my life—don’t ask for details, I’m not gonna give ’em to you—but I can tell you, there are times that I have not been doing the right thing, and God put his heavy hand upon me. And I can tell you for sure, I never want to experience that again.”He explains that we don’t have to experience God’s discipline if we live our lives the right way. He makes another emphatic gesture with his right hand, this time with his thumb out in a way that evokes Bill Clinton. “Today,” he says, we can “start walking in a new direction.”As he always does, Jeffress invites anyone who wants to be saved to come forward and dedicate their life to Jesus Christ. His voice is soft. Even in a crowd of some 1,600 people, for a split second it can feel as if he’s talking to you personally. “It’s no coincidence that you’re hearing my voice today,” he says. When he’s done this morning, there are at least a dozen people walking down the aisles, ready to be born again. Jeffress continues. He cites the Old Testament tale of Nehemiah, who was inspired by God to rebuild the walls of Jerusalem. “The Bible says even heaven itself is gonna have a wall around it,” Jeffress adds. “Not everyone is gonna be allowed in.” You’ve read your last free article Subscribe Subscribe now, or to get 10 days of free access, sign up with your email. Cancel anytime. Sign UpI agree to the terms and conditions. Sign up for free accesscenter_img Enter your email address Why am I seeing this? First Name Editor’s Desk(Monthly)A message from the editors at Texas Monthly Never Miss a StorySign up for Texas Monthly’s State of Texas newsletter to get stories like this delivered to your inbox daily. Jeffress preaching at First Baptist Dallas on April 1, 2018.First Baptist Dallas Here’s Robert Jeffress in his office again, on a weekday afternoon in early fall. He’s sitting flat-footed in a blue leather chair, wearing one of his usual dark suits and satiny ties, like he’s ready to appear on camera at a moment’s notice, should the need arise. I’m sitting at the end of a big leather couch, a few feet away, with my recorder between us. We’re talking about the distinction he makes between what he considers spiritual and political. I want to know if it’s really tenable, if it’s really honest. On Twitter, he promotes his sermons and events at the church right next to his appearances on Fox News. When his choir performed “Make America Great Again” in D.C., it was a de facto Trump rally—and now the song is in the church hymn database. He doesn’t just invite Fox personalities like Sean Hannity and politicians like Ted Cruz and Greg Abbott into his sanctuary; the church often uses their appearances as bring-a-friend promotions. Our conversations over the months often return to this topic, and he agrees it’s an important one.“If someone asks me to talk on a subject,” he says, “I ask myself the first question: Does the Bible have a particular point of view on this?”The Bible has a point of view on many things, he explains. Some things, like capital punishment or whether a country’s leader has a right to defend its borders, he thinks, are clear. Other issues, like marginal tax rates and public health-care policy, are less clear. And besides, when Hannity was there to promote a Christian movie, they didn’t say much about politics at all.What about when you call Democrats the “party of immorality”? I ask. Isn’t that crossing the line into politics? “I think, in a lot of ways, the Republican party is just as spiritually bankrupt as the Democratic party, but at least at this point in time they are championing some moral principles like the right to life and the right of religious liberty.”It’s an interesting equivocation, and I’m reminded how, in our exchanges, he has emphatically insisted that he’s not a Republican or a Democrat. He has also told me his congregation has plenty of Democrats, though I haven’t met one. When I ask him if he’d ever invite a Democrat or someone from CNN to speak at his church, he laughs. “You know, I would have to think about it,” he says. Then he adds, “But if we haven’t, it’s not because they are Democrats. It’s because of the point of view they would articulate on these basic core spiritual issues. I mean, try to find me a pro-life Democrat leader. You can’t find one.”“Basic core spiritual issues” is usually his answer when I press him on why he goes out of his way, again and again, to defend Trump. He cares about religious liberty—which for him essentially boils down to whether churches and businesses should be required to provide birth control for employees and whether businesses can deny service to gay or trans people. And nearly every policy discussion eventually comes back to what he sees as the national battle that started in Dallas when he was a teenager. He believes Roe v. Wade, not the issue of sexual assault or of judicial temperament, was at the heart of the fight over the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court. The Democrats were worried that Kavanaugh’s rulings would “somehow lessen the number of babies being murdered every year in the womb through abortion.”Gun rights is one of the two main issues on which he disagrees with the Republican party. The other is health care. He has been a vocal critic of Obamacare, but Jeffress does tell me, “The GOP is on the wrong side of this.”This is why Trump is the sort of warrior evangelicals have long craved, a warrior who will fight for their beliefs regardless of whether he holds those beliefs himself. This is why Jeffress doesn’t worry about Trump’s personal behavior. “When you’re in a war, you don’t worry about style,” he explains. “Nobody would have criticized General Patton because of his language. We’re in a war here between good and evil. And to me, the president’s tone, his demeanor, just aren’t issues I choose to get involved with.” (When I look this up later, I learn that some top commanders and many members of Congress did criticize—and discipline—General Patton for verbally abusing and slapping two soldiers. He was suspended from his command and made to apologize.)I ask Jeffress why, since he believes all sin is equal, abortion is more important than every other issue. Criswell, his mentor, and other past religious leaders didn’t feel nearly as strongly about the topic. Criswell stated publicly that life begins at birth and didn’t change his stance until after the widespread use of ultrasound technology. “Criswell and other evangelicals were just ignorant of the science,” he says. “We didn’t have the ability to view a life inside the womb as we do today and understand that that’s a real, live human being.” What about children at the border and the administration’s policy of separating families? Doesn’t he think we should protect babies at our borders too?“Look,” he tells me, “if you have a woman who is convicted of a bank robbery and she has an infant child and she’s sent to prison, I mean, her baby is going to be ripped from her.”But of course, we have gradations of crimes in this country, and crossing a border—even if it’s illegal—is a far different thing than robbing a bank. This policy was instituted as a deterrent. I remind him that many people, including some Baptists, believe it’s a callous way to treat children.“If we don’t secure our borders, we’re enticing the needy people, the persecuted people, to make a dangerous journey to come to this country or try to enter illegally, and I think, in part, we are morally responsible for doing that,” he tells me. He compares it to laws that hold homeowners responsible when a child strays into an unfenced pool and drowns. “We’ve got to figure out a way to secure our borders and at the same time deal equitably and justly with people who want to enter this country for legitimate reasons.”I bring up some other children: the survivors of mass shootings. After the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High, in Parkland, Florida, when students organized marches across the country to protest U.S. gun laws, Jeffress told Fox News viewers that changing the laws would not help because laws couldn’t change the evil in someone’s heart—though maybe displaying the Ten Commandments in schools could. Talking with me, though, he admits that mass shootings weigh on him heavily. He points out that, in Genesis, the primary reason God floods the earth is violence. “God hates those who harm others,” he says. “I don’t believe that the Bible or even the Constitution gives a unilateral, unconditional, unrestrained right for guns. The government has a right and responsibility to control that.”Gun rights, in fact, is one of the two main issues on which he disagrees with the Republican party. The other is health care. He has been a vocal critic of Obamacare, but Jeffress does tell me, “The GOP is on the wrong side of this.” He says, “There ought to be a safety net” and “Americans want coverage for preexisting conditions” and that “before we dismantle something, we ought to have something better ready in its place.”I ask Jeffress if he’d be critical of, say, someone like Democratic senator Cory Booker, if the public learned he’d had an affair with a porn star.“I have to be consistent,” he tells me. “And consistent would say that my objection to Cory Booker would not be his personal life but his public policies.”Here’s Robert Jeffress in January 2016, sitting on Trump’s plane between campaign stops in Iowa, and the pastor and the presidential candidate are finishing their lunch of Wendy’s cheeseburgers when Jeffress says, “Mr. Trump, I believe you’re going to be the next president of the United States. And if that happens, it’s because God has a great purpose for you and for our nation.” Jeffress quotes from the book of Daniel, chapter two, and explains, “God is the one who establishes kings and removes kings.”Trump looks at the pastor and says, “Do you really believe that?”“Yes, sir, I do,” Jeffress says.Trump asks, “Do you believe God ordained Obama to be president?”“I do,” Jeffress tells Trump. “God has a purpose for every leader.”This is certainly not the way Jeffress talked about Barack Obama when he was president. Jeffress wasn’t a fan. Shortly before Mitt Romney secured the Republican nomination in 2012, Jeffress said he’d “hold [his] nose” and vote for him instead of Obama, despite believing that Mormonism is a cult and Romney is going to hell. (He’s also said that Jews, Hindus, Muslims, and nonbelievers are destined for hell.) He criticized both Obamacare and National Security Agency surveillance as violations of Americans’ freedom. In 2014, citing Obama’s support for same-sex marriage, Jeffress declared that the president was “paving the way for the Antichrist.”Jeffress very much believes that an Antichrist will rise to power one day—possibly soon—before Jesus returns to earth. This isn’t entirely surprising. After graduating from Baylor, he attended Dallas Theological Seminary, a hub of twentieth-century dispensational theology, where he was taught, and embraced, the idea that God reveals himself progressively through different dispensations, or ages, and that these would culminate in an epic showdown between Christ and a fearsome enemy. Key events of this apocalypse would occur in Israel, went the thinking, and it was common for dispensationalists to publicly identify people they thought might be the Antichrist. Henry Kissinger was a popular pick; so was Mikhail Gorbachev, whose prominent birthmark looked suspiciously, to some, like the mark of the beast. Eventually most religious figures stopped trying to identify the Antichrist and the exact date of Christ’s return, but they didn’t stop believing that the supernatural confrontation was imminent. At one point, not long after Trump meets with Kim Jong-un and it feels like we might be closer to nuclear annihilation than we have been in half a century, I ask Jeffress, mostly as a joke, whether evangelicals support this president because they secretly think he’s hastening the end times and the return of Jesus.Jeffress lets out a quick chirp of a laugh. Actually, he explains, a lot of evangelicals view Trump as a brief reprieve from a downward moral spiral: everything from the removal of Ten Commandments monuments to restrictions on prayer in schools to the ways our culture flaunts sex and corrupts minds. He’s under no illusion that the Democrats won’t return to power again one day. Trump, he says, is a way to push in the other direction, if only temporarily.He anticipates my follow-up. “Why would Christians want to put off the return of Christ?” he asks. “To give us more time to save people.” The truth for him personally, though, is that he also just likes Trump. Jeffress insists that theirs isn’t just a quid-pro-quo sort of friendship, a calculated, cynical partnership. He says he genuinely enjoys Trump’s company. He’d like to think they’d be friends regardless of the presidency.Jeffress says Trump isn’t as impulsive as he might seem. He says the president has told him how he workshops insulting nicknames he plans to call opponents on Twitter. He says he watched as Trump agonized at the White House over what to do about DACA recipients. He’s seen the president demonstrate diligence and control, unlike the raging character often depicted in the press.Several times in our conversation, Jeffress plays it a little safer and parses his words, saying that he and the president “aren’t bosom buddies.” Is he protecting himself in case one day his association with Trump becomes toxic?“Not at all,” he says. “I just want to be as accurate as possible.”A few months after his inauguration, Trump boasts about issuing an executive order instructing the Department of the Treasury not to pursue religious organizations when they violate the Johnson Amendment, which prohibits nonprofits from making partisan political statements, a restriction Jeffress has spoken out against for more than a decade. Then, in May 2018, the Trump administration does something even more important for evangelicals: it officially relocates the American embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem, much of which is regarded under international law as occupied territory. Jeffress, the lifelong dispensationalist, is invited to give the opening prayer at the new embassy’s dedication. He’s there, in Jerusalem, standing at the lectern with his eyes closed. He’s just feet from Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, Ivanka Trump, and Jared Kushner—all Jewish, all going to hell in Jeffress’s view, all sitting together in the front row. After thanking God for the blessing and protection of Israel, and for the work of both Netanyahu and the U.S. ambassador to Israel, Jeffress thanks God for the “tremendous leadership” of Donald Trump. “Without President Trump’s determination, resolve, and courage, we would not be here today,” Jeffress says. “We thank you every day that you have given us a president who boldly stands on the right side of history but, more importantly, stands on the right side of you, O God, when it comes to Israel.”A few months after that, in August, the White House hosts an elaborate dinner for a hundred or so evangelical leaders from across the country. Franklin Graham is there. So are James Dobson and Paula White, a TV host and pastor of a Florida megachurch. Jeffress is one of the preachers Trump thanks by name. Reading prepared remarks, the president lists his evangelical-friendly accomplishments: issuing orders limiting government funding for groups that provide abortions, helping to free an American pastor being held in Turkey, moving the embassy to Jerusalem. Of course, there’s no record of him mentioning any of these issues before campaigning for president and meeting people like Jeffress.At the end of his short speech, Trump thanks the religious leaders. He calls them “special people.” Then he looks up from his script.“The support you’ve given me has been incredible,” the president says. “But I really don’t feel guilty, because I have given you a lot back.” Here’s Robert Jeffress at a Maggiano’s in North Dallas, standing in front of two hundred or so people at an event called Dinner With the Pastor. Every few months, prospective church members are invited to have a meal and conversation in a private room, all on First Baptist’s tab. The massive serving plates on each table are full of ravioli slathered in cream, balsamic-glazed chicken, and meaty lasagna. There are Frisbee-size crème brûlées and gallons of iced tea. The highlight of the evening, though, is when attendees are invited to ask the pastor anything they want. One woman says she campaigned for Trump and wants to know if Jeffress really told him he knew he would be president. Jeffress recounts the conversation they had over Wendy’s cheeseburgers. But he adds that he doesn’t consider himself a Republican. First Baptist, he says, has “plenty of people who love President Trump and people who don’t love President Trump.”To watch him find new ways to justify his support is as impressive as it is exasperating.Someone wants to know when Jeffress finds time to read the Bible. Someone has a specific question about a verse in the book of Isaiah. Then a woman with an Australian accent asks Jeffress if Trump is saved. The room gets quiet. Jeffress explains that early on in his relationship with Trump, he asked, “Mr. Trump, what do I say when people ask me about your faith?” He says Trump responded, “Tell people that my faith is very important to me but that it’s also very personal.” Then someone asks if he agrees with the president about the news media. Jeffress looks right at me and smiles. He tells the audience that his mother was a high school journalism teacher. Her former students went on to work for some of the best newspapers in the country. “I honestly believe that most of the media tries their hardest to get it right,” he says, adding that the freedom of religion and freedom of the press are inextricably linked by the First Amendment. Over the following weeks, Jeffress and I discuss Russia and the forthcoming Mueller report, the joys of raising children (he has two daughters), the #MeToo movement and the church’s relationship with women. Every time we talk—no matter the headlines, no matter the president’s latest inflammatory remarks—Jeffress is steadfast in his defense of Trump. When the Mueller report is released in April and shows ample evidence of obstruction of justice, Jeffress says he still believes the entire investigation has been a political ploy to damage the president. To watch him find new ways to justify his support is as impressive as it is exasperating. I ask him if he’s bothered when the president tells easily disprovable lies—like when he claims, contrary to the evidence, that special prosecutor Robert Mueller is a Democrat. “I operate under the assumption that the president knows more than we do,” he says. “I think he probably has insight into that investigation that I don’t have.”Not once, in all the months we’ve met, has Jeffress criticized Trump. I want to know if he is at all concerned by the cost of this allegiance. I ask if he worries about turning off seekers with what they might perceive as his hypocrisy. Even Billy Graham ultimately regretted his involvement with Richard Nixon. He tells me he isn’t concerned. He endorses the president’s policies and not necessarily his behavior, he says, and most people are smart enough to know the difference. I ask if he worries that Trump is driving deeper the wedges in our society or stoking dangerous ideologies and emboldening nefarious actors. He tells me he believes the president has merely exposed the division in our country and that a public figure isn’t responsible when someone misinterprets a message as a call for violence. “There have been screwballs and zealots throughout history who have taken the truth and twisted it,” he says.I ask if he at least holds Trump accountable. Does he ever criticize the president in their private meetings? “If it had happened, I wouldn’t tell you about it,” he replies, “because I just feel like friends don’t do that to one another.”I ask him whether Trump might be a test from God, a test of whether Jeffress’s devotion is to the Bible’s teachings and requirements or whether it’s to a powerful leader whose policies he finds agreeable.“You have to operate on the best information that you have, and what we had in 2016 was the choice between two diametrically opposed candidates,” he says. “One was pro-life, pro–religious liberty, pro–conservative judiciary. His name was Donald Trump. One was a pro-choice candidate who would not stop an abortion or limit an abortion for any reason at all. It could not have been a more clear choice at that point.”Did he consider any of the sixteen other Republican candidates, most of whom would have appointed pro-life judges?“I don’t think any of them could have won,” Jeffress says.Jeffress is often asked what it would take for evangelicals to walk away from the president. If the economy collapses, he tells me, people will probably want a change. And if the president were caught being unfaithful to his wife while in office, he could see people having a problem with that. But more than anything, it would take a change in policies. “If he said, ‘You know, I think we’ve got enough conservatives on the Supreme Court. It’s time for us to have some more moderate views and balance things out.’ Or if he suddenly decided, ‘You know what, I used to be pro-choice, and then I turned pro-life. I’m gonna go back to pro-choice again.’ I mean, those would certainly be deal-breakers, I think.”Then he clarifies. He knows his audience. What he meant was that these changes would be deal-breakers for evangelicals politically, not for his own relationship with Trump.“I’m his friend,” he says. “I’ll never walk away.”This article originally appeared in the August 2019 issue of Texas Monthly with the headline “The Pastor and the President.” Subscribe today. Jeffress defended Trump when the president referred to a kneeling NFL player as a “son of a bitch.” He justified the administration’s separating children from their parents at the border. When Trump questioned why America would accept immigrants from “shithole countries,” Jeffress responded this way: “Apart from the vocabulary attributed to him, President Trump is right on target in his sentiment.”Ten days before tonight’s appearance with Dobbs, Jeffress was on a different Fox show, scoffing at a Christmas tweet from Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, a New York Democrat, suggesting that Jesus was a refugee. “There’s nothing in the Biblical text to suggest that Mary, Joseph, and Jesus came to Egypt to flee Herod illegally,” Jeffress said, laughing and shaking his head. “And they certainly didn’t come in a caravan of five thousand, threatening Egyptian sovereignty.”No doubt Jeffress knows that a lot of the people waiting at the border are there precisely because they want to enter legally, as asylum seekers, but that didn’t come up on air. These television exchanges, usually over in five minutes, don’t allow for such distinctions.Robert Jeffress being interviewed for a TV segment in Dallas on May 20, 2011.During this evening’s three-minute discussion with Dobbs, Jeffress sounds more like a fiery Old Testament prophet than a turn-the-other-cheek Christian: he decries Democrats for supporting sanctuary cities laws he believes led to the death of a police officer in California. He says Michigan representative Rashida Tlaib is “despicable” for using “gutter language to curse our president.” He declares, “The Democrats are the party of immorality.” He calls Romney a “self-righteous snake.” His animated ranting earns a belly laugh from Dobbs. Finally, the host tells him, “Pastor, good to have you with us!”With that, the camera’s off. After wiping away his TV makeup, Jeffress will walk out of the studio, drive to his home in North Dallas, and spend the rest of the evening watching TV with his wife, Amy. He may even watch a replay of tonight’s show. TV reaches people, and reaching people is important to Jeffress. And to reach people, he knows, you must understand who they are and how they will hear you. You must be, as the Apostle Paul once put it, all things to all people.Here’s Robert Jeffress as a boy in the sixties, well-mannered and bright, so infatuated with the power of television that he dreams of one day becoming—of all things—an executive producer on a TV show. He’s so dedicated to this dream, so enthralled by show business, that he wakes up early some days to play his accordion before school on a children’s morning show in Dallas called Mr. Peppermint.His family lives in Richardson, but they spend plenty of time at First Baptist, downtown. It’s a turbulent time for Dallas, where the president has just been assassinated, and for the church, which is reckoning with desegregation. First Baptist has always been enmeshed in politics: George Truett, who became pastor in 1897, gave his most famous sermon, about the separation of church and state, on the steps of the U.S. Capitol, in Washington, D.C. His successor, W. A. Criswell, is not shy either: He has decried the Supreme Court decision to desegregate schools as “idiocy” and suggested that Catholics do not make good presidents. In 1968 Criswell reverses his position on desegregation and is soon thereafter voted in as president of the Southern Baptist Convention. The move puts North Texas at the center of a massive conservative movement.His ninth-grade speech teacher tells him, “Jeffress, you’re going to be a preacher one day, and it scares the bejeebers out of me because you can sell anybody anything!”Young Robert absorbs all this. His parents campaign for Barry Goldwater in 1964. When he is fourteen, Roe v. Wade goes to court, just a short walk from First Baptist; he’s seventeen when the Supreme Court legalizes access to abortion. In 1976 Criswell endorses Gerald Ford from the pulpit, but Jeffress casts his ballot—his first—for a Democrat, a born-again Christian from Georgia named Jimmy Carter. This Week in Texas(Weekly)The best stories from Texas Monthly The State of Texas(Daily)A daily digest of Texas news, plus the latest from Texas Monthly Last Namelast_img read more

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SAINTS have launched a brand new redesigned websit

first_imgSAINTS have launched a brand new redesigned website in time for the 2011 Super League season. Easy to use and fully interactive it represents a significant ramping up of the club’s digital offering.The site is searchable with specific sections for News, The Club, Fixtures, Results, Lottery, Hospitality and Community. It also has a new Fanzone which features downloads, podcast and video links – including the latest Super League Touchline programme and exclusive match highlights.Finding your favourite player is also easier in the new Team section.The popular Match Centre section has been upgraded to feature minute-by-minute updates alongside team line ups and other fantastic additions.And, the club has also invested in a state-of-the-art ticketing system that will improve all fans’ interaction with their team.Through the tickets’ link, you can select your seat online for Saints matches throughout 2011 making it simple to watch your club this season.“We’ve worked hard with EMS Internet, our internet partner, and Green 4 our ticketing partner, to deliver a website that provides our fans with the information they need,” said Saints’ Media Manager Mike Appleton. “As we approach a new era with a new stadium it’s important fans can interact with the club as easily as possible and get involved in what will be an exciting time for all.“Alongside our other digital offerings – the Saints Online Store, Saints Official Facebook, Saints Official Twitter and Saints eZines – we can stretch out to a wider fan base and continue to increase the name of the Saints and Rugby League too.“We’re sure all our supporters will love our new website and will make it their first port of call throughout this season.”Make sure you bookmark this site as your first port of call for everything Saints!last_img read more

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SAINTS were edged 3528 by Warrington Wolves in a

first_imgSAINTS were edged 35-28 by Warrington Wolves in a real classic at the Halliwell Jones Stadium on Friday.In a game that ebbed and flowed Saints were down and out, back in it, back out and then in it again before Lee Briers’ late drop goal.A remarkable half saw Saints losing 18-0 after just 15 minutes before producing an amazing comeback to lead 22-18.Royce Simmons’ men would’ve had feelings of deva vu as Warrington rattled up points a plenty with their first coming in the second minute through Michael Monaghan before Rhys Williams and Matt King looked like they’d put the nail in.But once James Graham crossed Saints were on fire and tries from Lee Gaskell, Jamie Foster and Tony Puletua put them in control.A truly amazing and breathtaking turnaround.In the second half, Ben Westwood put Warrington ahead as both sides struggled to complete sets then tries from Paul Wood and Brett Hodgson gave Saints another mountain to climb.It was 16 unanswered points – after 22 from Saints – and they had no answer until Tony Puletua set up a grandstand finish with his second of the night.Briers added a drop goal with five minutes to go and that was enough to scrape home.Saints welcomed back Scott Moore and Josh Perry into the 17 whilst Michael Shenton was replaced by Sia Soliola in the centres.Paul Wood returning for Warrington has they looked for their first double over that Saints since 1993/4.After last week’s defeat, Saints would have wanted to get a good pening set – but they couldn’t have got off to the worse possible start.As Lee Gaskell cleared on the last tackle, his kick was charged down and Michael Monaghan chipped ahead and grounded to put Warrington ahead.Brett Hodgson converting.Then after three penalties were given away in a row, the video referee had a long hard look at a pass that went to the ground – but was finished off by Rhys McWilliams – giving the try despite two knock ons and a forward pass.Hodgson converting once more.Saints were on the rack and it got worse moments later as Briers’ kick to the corner was put down by Matt King. The Aussie out jumping Jamie Foster to give Saints a mountain to climb.15 minutes in and 18-0 down.But a couple of minutes later James Graham finally got Saints on the board with a characteristic run.Foster tagging on the two.From the restart Saints then gained another set of six and down the right, Lomax and Wilkin combined for TP and Sia to put Gaskell in.Foster making it a six point game.And then it got even better. Saints won a penalty and made it count – James Graham ploughing in for the field position to send it left through Meli and to Foster.Six tries in 25 minutes, a fantastic advert for the sport….Saints had dominated since the 17th minute and they eventually went ahead when Lomax took an awkward pass, danced through and fed Tony Puletua to send the away support bananas.Foster making it 22-18 to cap a remarkable comeback.Half Time: Warrington 18 Saints 22Warrington started the half stronger and won a repeat set in the 45th minute before gaining a penalty right on Saints’ line.But the defence held firm and Saints won a repeat set of their own after a penalty.On 50 minutes James Roby hammered a 40:20 but the ball went to ground.It was turning into whoever could complete their sets better as both sides were failing to complete their sets.And after another penalty when they needed it – as seemed the case all night – Briers got the ball off to Westwood who drew the Wolves level.Hodgson making it 22-24.Minutes later the Wolves went ahead further and Saints were fuming. A penalty handed Warrington a set on Saints’ line and Myler put Wood in.Jamie Foster sent the ball out on the full from the restart – his kick hitting the crossbar – and Brett Hodgson scored in the corner – with a clear obstruction – to lead 34-22.Ironically, a carbon copy of that try was ruled out by the video referee in Saints 14-all draw with Bradford two weeks earlier.In fact all of Warrington’s three second half scores may have been controversial.But on the back of three penalties Saints were in it once again with TP ploughing over – Foster converting quickly.But Lee Briers added a drop goal late on to make it a seven point game and it was just enough for them to edge the clash.Match Summary:Warrington:Tries: Monaghan, Williams, King, Westwood, Wood, HodgsonGoals: Hodgson (5 from 6)Drop: BriersSaints:Tries: Graham, Gaskell, Foster, Puletua (2)Goals: Foster (4 from 5)Penalties:Warrington: 13Saints: 12HT: 22-18FT: 28-35REF: Richard SilverwoodATT: 13500Teams:Warrington:1. Brett Hodgson; 3. Matt King, 4. Chris Bridge, 23. Ryan Atkins, 22. Rhys Williams; 6. Lee Briers, 7. Richie Myler; 8. Adrian Morley, 9. Michael Monaghan, 10. Gareth Carvell, 17. Simon Grix, 12. Ben Westwood, 13. Ben Harrison.Subs: 14. Mickey Higham, 16. Paul Wood, 20. Matty Blythe, 26. David Solomona.Saints:1. Paul Wellens; 28. Thomas Makinson, 4. Sia Soliola, 5. Francis Meli, 22. Jamie Foster; 25. Lee Gaskell, 20. Jonny Lomax; 10. James Graham, 9. James Roby, 15. Louie McCarthy-Scarsbrook, 12. Jon Wilkin, 13. Chris Flannery, 11. Tony Puletua.Subs: 7. Kyle Eastmond, 8. Josh Perry, 14. Scott Moore, 19. Andy Dixon.last_img read more

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TOMMY Makinson has made the case for the defence a

first_imgTOMMY Makinson has made the case for the defence ahead of this Friday’s First Utility Super League clash with Castleford Tigers.The winger bagged his first try of the season last week and is looking for more of the same when the two sides meet at Langtree Park.“They are a great side with a fair number of strike players,” he said. “They like to give the ball some air time – and it works with good finishers, halves and forwards.“We will have to get our defence right against them and then we can move the ball. It is important for us to pick up as many points as we can.”Tommy had a disrupted pre-season due to injury but is pleased to have put that behind him with a solid performance last Friday at Hull KR.He continued: “I’m enjoying being back out there and with my teammates. It’s been good to strike up a partnership with Dominique Peyroux too.“I have been blessed over the years to play with some really good centres. Michael Shenton, Jordan Turner and Mark Percival for instance – and now I have a great one in Dominique Peyroux.“I have to be honest and say I hadn’t heard of him before he came over but that he was an NRL player and decent one at that.“He has added a lot to our team. He is strong, defends well and had a nice skillset. I’m enjoying playing for him and he can only do good things for us.”Saints take on Castleford Tigers in the fourth round of the First Utility Super League on Friday March 4 at Langtree Park.The game will kick off at 8pm.Tickets can be bought by popping into the Ticket Office at Langtree Park, by calling 01744 455 052 or online here.last_img read more

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WFD Improperly discarded smoking materials started Glen Apartments fire

first_img Wilmington Assistant Fire Chief Rick Pearsall says the call came in around 10:30 last night.When they arrived they saw fire running along the roof of four apartments. Crews were able to enter the building, but they had to get back out because of safety concerns.Residents say they could smell what they thought was burning rubber.Related Article: Wilmington firefighters honored for rescue during Hurricane Florence“I was sitting in my living room and I had the door open so I could smell it right away,” Faith Copeland said. “It kind of just smelt like burning rubber and I walked outside and I could see the smoke in the breeze and then all of a sudden the cops started coming in.”It took firefighters about an hour to get the fire fully under control.No one got hurt. The Red Cross is helping the families whose apartments were damaged from the fire. WILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) — Investigators say a fire that burned a few building at the Glen Apartments Tuesday night was started by someone who was smoking.Wilmington Fire Department say improperly discarded smoking materials is the official cause of the blaze on Filmore Drive.- Advertisement – last_img read more

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Parole granted for man who opened fire outside Pender County club

first_imgTerry Dion James (Photo: NCDPS) PENDER COUNTY, NC (WWAY) — The man who received a life sentence for murder is getting out of prison in 2021.According to the Post-Release Supervision and Parole Commission, they approved parole for Terry Dion James.- Advertisement – Records show James was convicted of first-degree murder and other crimes for opening fire with a semi-automatic gun outside a Pender County club in March 1993.Hartense James, who had left the club after getting a warning from another patron who James had told not to go back in because he and his friends were going “to shoot the place up” was shot as he tried to get in his car and start it. James died at the hospital from the gunshot wound.James was convicted in 1994.Related Article: #UNSOLVED: Opioid crisis fuels violent crime, recurring property crimeIn September, the state announced James was up for parole. He is eligible for the state’s Mutual Agreement Parole Program (MAPP), because he committed his crimes before a change in North Carolina’s sentencing laws did away with parole in October 1994.He will be released January 19, 2021.last_img read more

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LIVE PD Female Wilmington Police officers featured on Lifetime Series

first_imgWilmington Police Department says several of their female officers will be featured on a new series set to air on the Lifetime channel next month. (Photo: WPD) WILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) — Women in law enforcement will soon be getting more attention thanks to a new Lifetime Series that will be released this summer featuring some of our local officers.Lifetime will kicks off Monday nights starting June with the new spinoff series, LIVE PD Presents: Women on Patrol at 9 p.m. This will shine a spotlight on the female officers in the line of duty, from the team behind A&E’s hit series, Live PD.- Advertisement – From Big Fish Entertainment, producers of A&E’s hit series Live PD, Lifetime’s Women on Patrol will follow female law enforcement officers from around the country including departments in Jackson (WY), Wilmington (NC), Tempe (AZ) and Stockton (CA) as well as officers featured on Live PD.According to Broadwayworld.com, viewers are provided an unfiltered and unfettered look at the female officers on the front line of some of the busiest police forces in the country as they patrol their communities in a twenty-episode half-hour series.last_img read more

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Man wanted after human error leads to accidental release from jail

first_imgCOLUMBUS COUNTY, NC (WWAY) — The Columbus County Sheriff’s Office has reprimanded a detention officer after a man was accidentally released from the detention center.The sheriff’s office is searching for Andre Delmas Shipman, 23.- Advertisement – According to a news release from Sheriff Lewis Hatcher, on October 29, Shipman was arrested and charged by Whiteville Police for possession of a firearm by a felon, possession of a stolen firearm, carrying a concealed gun, and possession with the intent to sell/deliver marijuana.Shipman also had an outstanding warrant for a parole violation.  Shipman was transported to Columbus County Law Enforcement Center where he was processed on those charges.The sheriff’s office says during the booking process, a step was not completed when the parole warrant was served.Related Article: Dogs attack 76-year-old attending funeral in South CarolinaThis step would have ensured that Shipman was held for the parole violation.  The sheriff’s office says this process of serving a parole warrant is different than the process of serving other types of warrants.  A release order is not provided with a parole warrant, unlike other types of warrants.‘Because of this variable and human error’ Shipman was prematurely released.The sheriff’s office says they have policies and procedures in place to prevent this from happening, but a detention officer did not follow protocol.  No word on how the responsible detention officer was reprimanded.Andre Shipman is 5’6” tall and weighs approximately 140 pounds.  He has brown eyes and black hair.  If you know where is, contact Columbus County Sheriff’s Office at (910) 642-6551.last_img read more

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Antonio Mizzi appointed Commissioner for Laws

first_imgThe government has appointed Judge Emeritus Antonio Mizzi as Commissioner of Laws from the 1st of June 2019 replacing lawyer Franco Debono for a period of one calendar year, with the possibility of renewal. Judge Emeritus Mizzi became a lawyer in 1979 and continued his post-graduate education with a degree in European law in 1996. He has also served in the Maltese Courts as a magistrate between 1987 and 2013, and a judge between 2013 and 2018. Recently he was presiding over the Panama Papers case in Court. Former Partit Nazzjonalista leader Simon Busuttil had objected on Mizzi judging the cases as the Mizzi’s wife is former European Parliament member for Partit Laburista Marlene Mizzi. The case was initiated after Busuttil had asked the Courts to investigate what had been discovered on persons holding high public positions in the Panama Papers. WhatsApp <a href=’http://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/ck.php?n=ab2c8853&amp;cb={random}’ target=’_blank’><img src=’https://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/avw.php?zoneid=97&amp;cb={random}&amp;n=ab2c8853&amp;ct0={clickurl_enc}’ border=’0′ alt=” /></a>center_img SharePrintlast_img read more

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UCC Launches New Transport Management Hackathon

first_imgA journey into the very thickness of Kampala’s transportation landscape. (Photo Courtesy) Advertisement The Uganda Communications Commission (UCC) in partnership with Makerere University School of Public Health – Resilient Africa Network has announced the launch of a new hackathon aimed at reducing road accidents in the country.Named Smart Transport Management Hackathon, the 48-hour contest will run from May 24th to May 25th at the Kampala Serena Hotel.It will majorly seek for ideas on how to better manage traffic flow; with the increasing number of private cars in Uganda while most of the roads remain narrow. – Advertisement – It also seeks to explore health and safety assurance of road users including drivers, passengers and pedestrians.“In Uganda, like any other developing countries in Africa, the poor state of transport infrastructure is a looming problem which often leads to accidents and high costs of doing business,” UCC wrote in a statement released on Wednesday.A 2014 Uganda Police incident report on injury and fatality trends indicates that the number of fatalities on Ugandan roads as a result of road accidents was at 5,145.The hackathon seeks to help and empower innovators with startups that aim at curbing fatalities on roads as well as create a better transport management platform.It is also part of the ongoing ACIA Awards competition that fosters innovation through recognition and reward of outstanding ICT innovators in the country.The hackathon is open to all interested applicants including students, fresh graduates, young entrepreneurs, public health specialists, software engineers, among others.From the applications, not more than 35 participants shall be selected and/or not more than 7 teams.[related-posts]last_img read more

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STAR PREVIEW Southampton v Burnley

first_img[dropcap]N[/dropcap]o mistakes from Chelsea yesterday, comfortably landing the HT/FT recommendation for the column and thankfully I dodged the coupon busting Man City and Tottenham games.With those two sides drawing it was almost a ‘six-pointer’ for Chelsea.We still have Liverpool v Man U to come on Monday but ahead of that a trip to St Mary’s for Southampton v Burnley.My first instinct was that Southampton looked a little short, they haven’t scored in their last two games and their wins so far this season haven’t come against the top flight clubs.I’ve been impressed with Burnley’s transition to the Premier League. 14th in the table and they were desperately unlucky not to get a point from the Arsenal game when the Gunners snatched a last second highly questionable goal.Burnley proved they’re a match for anyone with a 2-0 win over Liverpool in August.Burnley manager Sean Dyche said: “We have to be intent on doing what we do and have belief in what we do and so far we’ve had a solid start.“We want that to continue, though we’re obviously aware it’s a tough place to go.”Southampton v BurnleyPremier League16:00 Sky Sports 1 / Sky Sports 1 HD / Sky Sports Ultra HDHEAD TO HEAD RECORD(Maximum 10 matches)Mar 2015 PREMIER LEAGUE Southampton 2 – 0 BurnleyDec 2014 PREMIER LEAGUE Burnley 1 – 0 SouthamptonJan 2014 ENGLISH FA CUP Southampton 4 – 3 BurnleyFeb 2012 CHAMPIONSHIP Southampton 2 – 0 BurnleySep 2011 CHAMPIONSHIP Burnley 1 – 1 SouthamptonApr 2009 CHAMPIONSHIP Southampton 2 – 2 BurnleyDec 2008 CHAMPIONSHIP Burnley 3 – 2 SouthamptonApr 2008 CHAMPIONSHIP Southampton 0 – 1 BurnleyOct 2007 CHAMPIONSHIP Burnley 2 – 3 SouthamptonJan 2007 CHAMPIONSHIP Southampton 0 – 0 BurnleyI think it will be a low scoring game and think the DRAW at around 4/1 looks generous with Star Sports.RECOMMENDED BETS (scale of 1-100 points)BACK DRAW 5 points at 4/1 with Star SportsPROFIT/LOSS SINCE EUROS: +93.08 pointsBET NOW WITH STAR SPORTS 08000 521 321last_img read more

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STARTERS ORDERS Mon Movers Specials

first_imgHORSE RACING5.20 SouthwellSentimental Gent 5/2 > 6/45.50 SouthwellCococabala 14/1 > 15/27.00 KilbegganGangster 11/8 > evens7.20 SouthwellEponina 6/1 > 7/28.10 WindsorGift Of Raaj 5/2 > 15/8LIVE FOOTBALLPremier League20:00 Sky Sports Premier League / Sky Sports Main Event / Sky Sports Ultra HD1/6 Tottenham Hotspur 18/1 Watford 15/2 DRAWLa Liga20:00 Sky Sports Football2/5 Real Betis 15/2 Malaga 4/1 DRAW Welcome to Starters Orders. Our daily midday update from the trading room at Star Sports with our key market movers for the day across all sports.Monday 30 AprilDAILY SPECIALS BET NOW starsports.bet or 08000 521 321last_img read more

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BENS BLOG The Top 7 Things They Didnt Teach You At School

first_img1) It/All/Everyone/Everything is a total blag. They’re virtually all Bullshitters. Part of life, is a journey to find just a few things and people, that/who are genuine.2) Lust & Love. They are very different things. Not knowing the difference between the two, or not being able to move on from unrequited hopes of either, can waste vast chunks of your life. And the latter is what is left when the former has gone forevermore.3) 10 years ago, what were your ‘Competitors’ doing? Oh, Blog, can you not even remember who those so called competitors even were? That’s because competitors don’t even exist. So don’t worry about what anybody else MIGHT be up to. JUST CONCENTRATE ON YOUR OWN GAME.4) Feeling fucked-off? Permanently exhausted? Cheated? Misunderstood? But why are you making a Sulking-Face, Blog? Nobody cares. You need to keep making a Nice-Face; ALL.THE. TIME. Life’s unfair. The sooner you’ve accepted this, the easier it all becomes.5) Good, clever, healthy and sensible people, sometimes die young, go bankrupt, or get divorced. And it’s very sad. But Flash people ALWAYS fall. Because there’s nothing under the surface. Don’t get too close; or you could get carried down with them.6) You will make the error of believing that others will treat you with the same values that you have treated them. And the sharpest knives will come from those closest to you. But when they’ve done their work, and everybody’s moved on, don’t change the person you are; DON’T LOWER YOURSELF, in your future, to their level.7) Flirtations are Flirtations. Holiday Romances are Holiday Romances. Life-Partners are Life-Partners. Friends are Friends. And Business-Associates are Business-Associates. Don’t try and make people what they aren’t. YOU WILL ONLY DISAPPOINT YOURSELF.JUST KEEP GOING.Over and out, B xlast_img read more

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TALES FROM THE RING Cheltenham Friday

first_img12:10 British Stallion Studs EBF ‘National Hunt’ Novices’ HurdleLofty described business in the opener as ‘better than I expected’ but expectations for the race evidently weren’t high. Field money was modest but had at least been ‘taken well’. Losers at the off were 11/8 second-in Jarveys Plate and 125/1 outsider Tricks And Trails. ‘Going for’ favourites is rarely big or clever but when it happens unintentionally and you cop over one you take it. Triumphant Elixir De Nutz the 6/5 jolly was a winner in the book for a decent lunch for two at The Oslo Court in a race where most other firms would have lost their money. A good start by default.12:45 Neville Lumb Novices’ ChaseNext up was a four-runner heat, it looked competitive enough though. The World’s End opened 7/4 and was backed to 6/4 before bouncing back again. It was easy to lay all the horses, the book was looking nice and tidy until a cash punter came in with £2500 – £1000 Lil Rockerfeller. Given the modest level of business, there was no way we were going to bet up to it and at the off it was a loser for four-figures. Talk about London buses, two winning favourites in a row and a cop in the book, a decent one this time, both times.1:20 Catesby Handicap HurdleAt around 3/1 the field, the next heat was much more competitive, ‘very poor business too’ growled Lofty from behind the joint. There was a late move for Master Work, 12/1 into 8/1 but nobody had a lump on with us. At the off the book had three three-figure losers in it with the field money not nudging four-figures. That’s not clever bookmaking in anyone’s language.3/1 favourite Al Dancer won the race and this time the firm did their money in the right and proper manner the same as everyone else. The books had a while to acclimatise to yet another loser as it just went further and further away after the last. The jolly first, the rest nowhere.On the bright side, the side we always wish to look, being still well up after three winning favourites was not a bad place to be.1:55 CF Roberts Electrical & Mechanical Services Mares’ Handicap ChaseThey opened 11/2 the field the next, ultra competitive given it was just a 10-runner heat. As Lofty pointed out ‘the favourite for some Grand Nationals is shorter than this’. Quite what was going to be favourite was in doubt for most of the betting.All eyes, or at least those that knew the connection were watching the Freddie Williams joint, Julie’s husband Kevin has a leg in Gordon Elliott’s Synopsis. The firm were a point or so lower throughout the betting, though Julie assured me it was out of loyalty rather than a strong fancy. At the off Skewiff was sent off favourite at 9/2.As Synopsis powered home by 10 lengths at 13/2 readers could be excused for thinking that Julie had underplayed the chances of the winner. Not a bit of it, I was stood by the joint as both Kevin and Julie greeted the victory with a mixture of delight and surprise, the mare defying top weight.I collared Kevin as he breathlessly got back to the joint and asked him the plans for Synopsis, he just gave me ‘the look’ and replied ‘I don’t know, I still need to get over this win!’Synopsis co-owner Kevin McMunigal and Julie Williams all smiles after her victory.2:30 CF Roberts 25 Years Of Sponsorship Handicap ChaseThe next race saw money for Singlefarmpayment and Coo Star Sivola the latter despite stable ‘mole’ Armaloft Alex less than enthusiastic summing up of Lizzie Kelly’s mount’s chances. Alex was right and the money was wrong, Singlefarmpayment’s backers were nearer the mark but had to settle for runner-up spot. Racegoers were treated to a terrific three-way finish which saw Cogry get up close home to record a 9/1 win and a decent cop in the book.3:05 Glenfarclas Cross Country Handicap ChaseConsidering it was the cross country race the punters were keen to be on and backed several horses which was good. The bad thing was they backed the same several. At the off there were four losers in the book, Ballycasey by far the worst for four figures. Wounded Warrior was the next worse ‘They’ll probably finish hand in hand clear’ bemoaned a morose Lofty.Luckily Lofty was wide of the mark. 6/1 winner Fact Of The Matter was an excellent winner in the book which was once again just luck the way they came in for them. Or was it? After the race youthful Head of On-Course Jamie flourished a betting slip on the winner, at 7/1 too. He wouldn’t have had a lean up his fancy would he? The jury is out, the bottom line was the firm copped again. I hate to say it though, the ticket ensured he’s marked down, he had a fair bet but didn’t ask for fractions. Always ask for fractions on course, if you are unaware of them, please read this and start betting like a pro! CLICK HERE3:40 Citipost Handicap HurdleI bumped into Colin and Sue just before the off of the last. Colin is a legend of the betting ring while Sue regularly wins best turned out. Colin bagged 7/2 the jolly, Worthy Farm.At the off the book had just two losers Clondaw Native and Worthy Farm.Worthy Farm ran well for a long way but this time Colin’s money stayed in the hod as Aaron Lad’s victory ensured a winning day for the firm. We’re back tomorrow where they tell us we’ll be getting a soaking!SIMON NOTT CHELTENHAM FRIDAY: Simon Nott reports from day one of the International Meeting at Cheltenham – direct from the Star Sports pitch. It was cold and unseasonably fast out on the track – how did the barometer swing in the ring throughout the afternoon?With the sun shining down, Martyn of Leicester hollering ‘Money without work’ at the top of his lungs and the Pickwick-Bevan firm going all out to support Christmas Jumper Day, all was well in the betting ring as betting got underway in the opener. Simon Nott is author of:Skint Mob! Tales from the Betting RingCLICK HERE FOR MORE DETAILSlast_img read more

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STAR PREVIEW Man U v Chelsea

first_imgThe race for the top four seems to be the one that no team can win. In the last week all of Tottenham, Arsenal, Chelsea and Manchester United have dropped points and now the last two meet in another mega big-six encounter.Manchester United fans had a conflicting experience in midweek, where City were too good in the Derby. That would normally be a crushing experience for fans of the Red Devils, but the likely denial of a first Premier League title for Liverpool could soften that blow. Another defeat here, however, would cap an extremely flat ending to the season.Chelsea are in the semi-finals of the Europa League, and still have a chance of that and taking a top four spot, although they blew an opportunity to take control of the race against Burnley in midweek with a 2-2 draw.That said, Maurizio Sarri is in a better position than Ole Gunnar Solskjaer as we speak. Chelsea have been playing decent football for the past few weeks and scoring plenty of goals, even if they have relied a huge amount on Eden Hazard. Gonzalo Higuain has struggled for goals, but the belting goal he smashed in on Monday should help his confidence.Hazard was once again outstanding in turning back an initial Burnley advantage on Tuesday and linked well with a more free flowing N’Golo Kante, and both of them will look to take advantage of any United gaps in midfield too. The loss of Callum Hudson-Odoi after he ruptured his tendon but Reuben Loftus-Cheek has been one of Chelsea’s better attacking influences lately.Man Utd v ChelseaPremier League16:30 Sky Sports Premier League / Sky Sports Main Event / Sky Sports Ultra HDHEAD TO HEAD RECORD(Maximum 10 matches, past 10 years)FEB 2019 FA CUP Chelsea 0-2 Manchester UnitedOCT 2018 PREMIER LEAGUE Chelsea 2-2 Manchester UnitedMAY 2018 FA CUP Chelsea 1-0 Manchester UnitedFEB 2018 PREMIER LEAGUE Manchester United 2-1 ChelseaNOV 2017 PREMIER LEAGUE Chelsea 1-0 Manchester UnitedAPR 2017 PREMIER LEAGUE Manchester United 2-0 ChelseaMAR 2017 FA CUP Chelsea 1-0 Manchester UnitedOCT 2016 PREMIER LEAGUE Chelsea 4-0 Manchester UnitedFEB 2016 PREMIER LEAGUE Chelsea 1-1 Manchester UnitedDEC 2015 PREMIER LEAGUE Manchester United 0-0 ChelseaUnited were outmatched by City in midweek, although they should have had a goal with Jesse Lingard air kicking an open net, and they ought to get more chances against a Chelsea side which has made a fair few defensive errors in the past week too. Indeed, Ederson had to be very sharp to prevent United taking the lead Marcus Rashford’s pace will be aimed at David Luiz, and if the high press that United have employed works – and they have had some success with it – then there’ll be chances for them to finally get another goal from open play.Their Manchester Derby defeat was a seventh in nine games since Solskjaer took the job and whist it was an improvement on the truly abject showing at Everton, there’s no reason to take 13/8 on them. Indeed 17/10 on Chelsea is fairly tempting, but backing goals is a far more appealing bet than trusting either side.RECOMMENDED BETS (scale of 1-100 points)BACK OVER 2.5 GOALS 5 pts at 5/6 with starsports.betPROFIT/LOSS SINCE JAN 1 2017: PROFIT 280.92 points(excluding Premier League ante-post, RBC Heritage)last_img read more

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Pool Feed for Rice Student Computer Chess Game

first_imgFacebookTwitterPrintEmailAddThis ShareMedia AdvisoryCONTACT: Lisa Nutting PHONE: (713) 831-4796`POOL’ FEED FOR RICE STUDENT, COMPUTER CHESS GAME Television coverage of the chess game between Ricejunior Nathan Doughty and “DB Junior,” a smaller version of Deep Blue, the IBMchess machine, will be available today by “pool” feed from a conference room inthe Anne and Charles Duncan Hall on the Rice campus. The university will providea mult-box for camera crews to receive the direct audio/visual feed from thegame site.Organizers of the chess game want as little disruption as possible during thecontest to allow both Doughty and “DB Junior” to concentrate on theirstrategies. Camera crews, reporters and still photographers will be allowed intothe match site before and after the game.The mult-box will be located at the control booth located on the northeastcorner of the hall on the ground floor. News Office staff will direct televisioncrews to the booth.The chess game is part of Rice’s Computer and Information TechnologyInstitute’s Distinguished Lecture Series. The program begins at 4 p.m. The chessmatch is scheduled to start at 5 p.m.Questions concerning coverage of this event should be directed to either LisaNutting at (713) 831-4796 or Philip Montgomery at (713) 831-4792.### last_img

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Offgrid sterilization with Rice Us solar steam

first_imgVIDEO is available at:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J2DbVQ6AnDsThe following IMAGE is available at: http://news.rice.edu/files/2012/11/SOLAR-1-WEB.jpgRice University graduate student Oara Neumann, left, and scientist Naomi Halas are co-authors of a new study about a highly efficient method of turning sunlight into heat. They expect their technology to have an initial impact as an ultra-small-scale system to treat human waste in developing nations without sewer systems or electricity. (Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University)A copy of the PNAS paper is available at:http://www.pnas.org/content/110/29/11677Follow Rice News and Media Relations via Twitter @RiceUNews Share4David Ruth713-348-6327david@rice.eduMike Williams713-348-6728mikewilliams@rice.edu Off-grid sterilization with Rice U.’s ‘solar steam’Solar-powered sterilization technology supported by Gates FoundationHOUSTON – (July 22, 2013) – Rice University nanotechnology researchers have unveiled a solar-powered sterilization system that could be a boon for more than 2.5 billion people who lack adequate sanitation. The “solar steam” sterilization system uses nanomaterials to convert as much as 80 percent of the energy in sunlight into germ-killing heat.The technology is described online in a July 8 paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Early Edition. In the paper, researchers from Rice’s Laboratory for Nanophotonics (LANP) show two ways that solar steam can be used for sterilization — one setup to clean medical instruments and another to sanitize human waste.“Sanitation and sterilization are enormous obstacles without reliable electricity,” said Rice photonics pioneer Naomi Halas, the director of LANP and lead researcher on the project, with senior co-author and Rice professor Peter Nordlander. “Solar steam’s efficiency at converting sunlight directly into steam opens up new possibilities for off-grid sterilization that simply aren’t available today.”In a previous study last year, Halas and colleagues showed that “solar steam” was so effective at direct conversion of solar energy into heat that it could even produce steam from ice water.“It makes steam directly from sunlight,” she said. “That means the steam forms immediately, even before the water boils.”Halas, Rice’s Stanley C. Moore Professor in Electrical and Computer Engineering, professor of physics, professor of chemistry and professor of biomedical engineering, is one of the world’s most-cited chemists. Her lab specializes in creating and studying light-activated particles. One of her creations, gold nanoshells, is the subject of several clinical trials for cancer treatment.Solar steam’s efficiency comes from light-harvesting nanoparticles that were created at LANP by Rice graduate student Oara Neumann, the lead author on the PNAS study. Neumann created a version of nanoshells that converts a broad spectrum of sunlight — including both visible and invisible bandwidths — directly into heat. When submerged in water and exposed to sunlight, the particles heat up so quickly they instantly vaporize water and create steam. The technology has an overall energy efficiency of 24 percent. Photovoltaic solar panels, by comparison, typically have an overall energy efficiency of around 15 percent.When used in the autoclaves in the tests, the heat and pressure created by the steam were sufficient to kill not just living microbes but also spores and viruses. The solar steam autoclave was designed by Rice undergraduates at Rice’s Oshman Engineering Design Kitchen and refined by Neumann and colleagues at LANP. In the PNAS study, standard tests for sterilization showed the solar steam autoclave could kill even the most heat-resistant microbes.“The process is very efficient,” Neumann said. “For the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation program that is sponsoring us, we needed to create a system that could handle the waste of a family of four with just two treatments per week, and the autoclave setup we reported in this paper can do that.”Halas said her team hopes to work with waste-treatment pioneer Sanivation to conduct the first field tests of the solar steam waste sterilizer at three sites in Kenya.“Sanitation technology isn’t glamorous, but it’s a matter of life and death for 2.5 billion people,” Halas said. “For this to really work, you need a technology that can be completely off-grid, that’s not that large, that functions relatively quickly, is easy to handle and doesn’t have dangerous components. Our Solar Steam system has all of that, and it’s the only technology we’ve seen that can completely sterilize waste. I can’t wait to see how it performs in the field.”Paper co-authors include Curtis Feronti, Albert Neumann, Anjie Dong, Kevin Schell, Benjamin Lu, Eric Kim, Mary Quinn, Shea Thompson, Nathaniel Grady, Maria Oden and Nordlander, all of Rice. The research was supported by a Grand Challenges grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and by the Welch Foundation.###center_img FacebookTwitterPrintEmailAddThislast_img read more

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