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Photographic memory

first_img“Photography and Chance,” the title of art historian Robin Kelsey’s forthcoming book, also could describe his unusual career trajectory.For example, there was a short stint in the mid-1990s as a lawyer.“I really didn’t enjoy law practice,” Kelsey conceded. “I love argument, I love debate, I was an intensive debater in high school, did some debating in college, and actually ended up coaching the Yale debate team when I was in law school. But I also love writing about pictures, and find that pictures draw me in a way that just working with text doesn’t.”Fast forward to 1999, when Kelsey was a Ph.D. student in Harvard’s Department of History of Art and Architecture. Attending a professional meeting, he couldn’t find a panel on landscape painting, the focus of his own dissertation, so he opted to speak at a session on landscape photography, presenting a talk on 19th century photographer Timothy O’Sullivan.“After I gave the talk, several members of the audience came up, established scholars from the field, and said how happy they were that I was working on this for my dissertation,” Kelsey said. “And of course I wasn’t working on this for my dissertation. But I thought afterward about the fact that when I did give talks on my dissertation, nobody came up and said the same thing. So I took this as a hint from the universe that I had perhaps stumbled upon a more promising topic than what I had been working on.”In short order, Kelsey shifted gears, producing a dissertation on O’Sullivan’s photographic survey of the American West following the Civil War. A year later, weighing Harvard’s offer of a junior faculty position as a historian of photography against offers from elsewhere in American art more generally, he again felt that the stars were aligning to nudge him toward photography.“So I leapt into this professional formation of myself as a photo historian, which was a steep learning curve since I had never done any graduate course work that was directed toward history of photography,” he said.Kelsey’s reinvention reached its denouement last year when he received tenure, becoming the Shirley Carter Burden Professor of Photography. He doesn’t regret the long and winding road to where he is today.“I feel very lucky to have been able to experience that formation,” he said. “I had the post-1960s view that finding one’s calling could be a very long process. I think it would be very hard now to do what I did. Young people these days feel much more urgency to get their lives sorted out.”In retrospect, a few threads in Kelsey’s childhood might have foreshadowed his ultimate destination. Both his mother and stepfather were anthropologists, at Hamline University and the University of Minnesota, respectively. Cameras were indispensable in documenting their fieldwork on Indian reservations and in Mexican villages, often with some of their six children in tow.“My grandfather was a very serious amateur photographer, with a darkroom,” Kelsey said. “I spent time in there, and was fascinated by the equipment and the process.”A product of public schools in Minneapolis, Kelsey thinks his middle-American upbringing also fed his interest in photography.“I think there’s something about growing up in the Midwest that gave me a populist angle on culture,” he said. “And so, for me, while I love all areas of art history, I think there is a special fit for me with photography, with its special democratic qualities.”Photography’s democratic tendencies, which Kelsey dates to the days of the daguerreotype, have only intensified with the advent of ever-more-accessible technologies.“When photography was invented, it was heralded as this great new democratic way of producing pictures,” he said, “but actually there have been subsequent revolutions that have democratized it even more radically, the ‘Kodak Moment’ being one, and our own digital moment being another.”Despite these advances, Kelsey himself has a conflicted relationship with the practice of photography. He admits to suffering from what might be called “photographer’s block.”“I feel burdened by knowing all that has been done, the brilliant things that have been done,” he said. “I am committed to becoming more serious about practice, but it will mean negotiating that past.”last_img read more

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The knotty problem of bringing regenerative medicine to market

first_imgWhen Lawrence Summers delivered his last commencement address as Harvard’s president 10 years ago, he spoke of the rosy future for stem cell science and regenerative medicine.The advancing technology, he said then, promised a cure for cancer, another for diabetes, a vaccine for Alzheimer’s disease, and ways to control AIDS, any one of which would have enormous impact around the world. Today, he believes he was too pessimistic.“Ten years later, I think, if anything, I underestimated the scientific potential,” said Summers, Harvard’s Charles W. Eliot University Professor, on Oct. 6. “I did not appreciate what subsequent research has demonstrated [as] stem cells’ capacity to address sickle cell anemia, to grow new heart cells and repair aging hearts, to replace tendons and ligaments, to address blood cancers … and to address certain forms of blindness that have been cured by stem cell transplants.”Today, Summers said, the field of regenerative medicine is poised to break out, generating treatments and cures for a host of ailments and becoming the foundation for a new branch of biomedical industry. With the research and development at Harvard and other universities, hospitals, and private companies in the region, Boston is poised to be a global center for that industry.On an evening already brimming with optimism, Lawrence Summers expressed his astonishment at the exponential progress of stem cell therapies. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff PhotographerBut it’s not guaranteed, Summers said. The region — including local, state, and federal governments — has to ensure the opportunity doesn’t slip through its grasp. He called for investments in infrastructure, increased federal research spending, and new collaborations between institutions and businesses.“It cannot make sense for, year after year, there to be more and more opportunity, more and more discovery, and less and less support for federal research, and that needs to be a priority,” Summers said. “No one succeeds alone. Newton said that if he’s seen further than others, it’s because he had stood on the shoulders of giants. And few of us are Newton.”Summers’ comments were delivered at Harvard Business School’s Spangler Center during the first FUSION Symposium, sponsored by the Harvard Office of Technology Development’s Blavatnik Biomedical Accelerator and Harvard Business School’s Blavatnik Fellowship in Life Science Entrepreneurship. The symposium brought together leaders from the scientific and business worlds to discuss both scientific progress in regenerative medicine and the critical process of getting scientific advances out of the lab and into patients’ hospital rooms.Optimism about the science abounded at the event. Professor of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology Mark Fishman said he believed regenerative medicine will prove to be the third big wave of transformative medicine, alongside control of infectious disease in the last century and today’s promising work to fight cancer.Research is taking two broad approaches, said Fishman, who stepped down last year after 13 years leading Novartis’ research effort. One is a “spare parts” approach, focused on developing cells, tissues and organs to replace those diseased or damaged in the body. The other focuses on mobilizing the body’s own regenerative capacity — the enhanced ability to replace and repair our own tissues that exists early in human development and in adult creatures such as zebrafish and salamanders.Vicki Sato, professor of management practice at HBS said it is the “obligation and responsibility” of business leaders to bring promising therapies to the market. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer“Regenerative medicine has to be the next great frontier,” said Fishman, who moderated a panel highlighting progress to fight blindness, heart failure, blood diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and musculoskeletal injury. The aging of the global population, Fishman said, increases the urgency of finding treatments to keep people healthy longer. “We have no choice, we have to make this work.”Business leaders at the event shared scientists’ enthusiasm about the technology’s promise, but indicated that the path toward commercializing its fruits is less clear. Treatments for a wide array of conditions and diseases are just starting to emerge from the lab, each with different strengths, weaknesses, and probability of commercial success. Even for those thought to be safe and effective, there often remains considerable scientific work to drive down costs and scale up production so they can be broadly distributed at an affordable price.“There’s no question … this science can work,” said Vicki Sato, professor of management practice at Harvard Business School and former president of Vertex Pharmaceuticals, who moderated a panel of business leaders. “As businesspeople, we have the obligation and responsibility to try to bring the science … to the marketplace.”Alexis Borisy, a biotech entrepreneur with Third Rock Ventures, said the problem today is that it’s so early there’s a lot of “noise” — early development and initial activity that is obscuring likely winners and losers. The best bet for investors, he said, is ignoring promising results whose scientific foundation is poorly understood and zeroing in on treatments and technology built on a solid scientific understanding.“I agree very, very much with the thesis put forward … this is going to be one of the great waves of biomedical innovation,” Borisy said. “We want to cure disease and extend the high-quality lifespan, and this is going to be one of the ways to go do that. But this is early and there’s an enormous amount of noise that is out there. … Not all of that is going to play out well.”SaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSavelast_img read more

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Chicago Star Jennifer Nettles Is Broadway.com’s Newest Vlogger!

first_img from $49.50 View Comments Related Shows Chicago Jennifer Nettles: Grammy winner, newfound Broadway darling, and now…Broadway.com vlogger! The Sugarland singer, who will make her Great White Way debut in Chicago as Roxie Hart beginning February 2, is next in line to grab a camera and take us backstage. Be on the lookout for Hart & Soul: Backstage at Chicago with Jennifer Nettles.center_img Hart & Soul will begin on January 27 and run every Tuesday. The country superstar will offer a glimpse of life at the Ambassador Theatre, including the rehearsal process leading up to her first Broadway bow. Expect plenty of Fosse choreography, cameos from co-stars (including fellow newcomers Carly Hughes and John Dossett) and much more. Nettles, along with Kristian Bush and Kristen Hall, formed the band Sugarland in 2003 and were nominated for a Best New Artist Grammy Award in 2006. She and Bush two took home two Grammys in 2009 for their single, “Stay.” Nettles also received a Grammy for her collaboration with Bon Jovi. Earlier this year, she released her first solo album, That Girl. Chicago marks her Broadway debut, though she’s also self-proclaimed besties with Idina Menzel.last_img read more

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Tix Now On Sale for B’way Return of Miss Saigon

first_img Miss Saigon This is the hour! Tickets are now available for the much-anticipated Great White Way revival of Miss Saigon. The production, which—like the original—hails from across the pond, will helicopter in to the Broadway Theatre, where the show made its New York premiere in 1991. The limited engagement will begin on March 1, 2017 and will play through January 14, 2018 before touring the U.S. Opening night is set for March 23.Newcomer Eva Noblezada and Jon Jon Briones will star as Kim—the role that launched Lea Salonga’s career—and the Engineer, respectively. They reprise their performances from the West End premiere of the Laurence Connor-helmed production. Additional cast will be announced later.Based on Puccini’s Madame Butterfly and set in 1975 during the final days of the American occupation of Saigon, the Boublil and Schönberg musical follows the relationship between an American GI and a young Vietnamese woman. Orphaned by war, 17-year-old Kim is forced to work as a bar girl in a sleazy Saigon nightclub run by “The Engineer.” John, an American GI, buys his friend Chris the services of Kim for the night, igniting a doomed trans-Pacific relationship.The original production premiered in the West End in 1989; it came to Broadway two years later and ran for nearly ten years. The revival opened at the West End’s Prince Edward Theatre in May 2014 and closed in February. The 25th anniversary gala performance of the revival was filmed in 2014 and will air in select movie theaters across the United States on September 22. In addition to Broadway, the new staging is set to play Japan, German, Australia and Asia. Tours are planned for the U.K., Europe and Middle East.The Broadway Theatre is currently the home of the revival of Fiddler on the Roof; the Bartlett Sher-helmed production will close on December 31. Eva Noblezada & Chris Peluso (Photo: Matthew Murphy & Michael Le Poer Trench) Related Showscenter_img View Comments Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 14, 2018last_img read more

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Woolly Aphids

first_imgWhat can you do? These insects produce several generations a year, so they can become very abundant by late summer. No long-term or serious damage to hackberry trees has been found, even after several years of infestations. Insecticides are not necessary for protecting the health of infested hackberry trees, but may be justified when honeydew and sooty mold becomes intolerable. One option is to just learn to live with woolly aphids by not parking cars or placing patio furniture directly beneath hackberry trees. Another option is to cut down hackberry trees in your landscape. This will immediately eliminate the problem since these aphids can only survive on hackberry trees. But tree removal may be very costly for larger trees and can eliminate valuable shade in your landscape. For larger hackberry trees, it’s not feasible to spray the leaves with an insecticide for control. Also keep in mind that the tree will need to be treated annually, because sooner or later these woolly aphids will return. It is possible to use a systemic insecticide, containing the active ingredient imidacloprid, applied as a root drench around the base of the tree. Systemic chemicals take several weeks to move from the roots into the leaves. Treatments made in late summer will not provide any benefit since the leaves will soon be falling off for winter. Systemic insecticides should be applied in the spring, shortly after the leaves emerge. Killing the first generation of these aphids can go a long way in preventing a severe infestation later in the summer. For larger trees, make the first application in spring, and follow up with an application in late summer for longer control. An aphid pest that came to Georgia two decades ago has some homeowners seeing “snow” falling from their hackberry trees and cleaning sticky goo off their cars. The “snowflakes” are actually a large infestation of Asian woolly hackberry aphids. These small, white insects fall off hackberry trees (also known as sugarberry trees) and seem to float in the air. Collectively falling, they can look like falling snow. Woolly aphids cause problems similar to whiteflies, scales and other aphids. They suck the sap out of the leaves and secrete sticky honeydew on them. As a result, a black mold, known as sooty mold, may cover the leaves, stems and bark of the tree. You may see a black, sticky mess not only on the hackberry tree, but also on any plant or object underneath it, including your car, porch or patio furniture. One client even experienced aphids, sticky leaves and sap falling into her swimming pool and making a mess. This exotic-invasive aphid was accidentally introduced into the United States in the late 1990s and can now be found from Florida to Texas. Wooly aphids are frequently mistaken for whiteflies, which can be common on gardenias and other landscape plants. Woolly aphids are found only on hackberry trees. If you find them on other plants or on your back porch, they landed there by accident. These aphids are not harmful to people and do not bite or sting. They’re mainly just a nuisance. What are hackberry trees? Hackberry trees have leaves that are dark green on top and pale green underneath. The leaves are alternately arranged and have an oblong shape (lopsided at the base of the leaf and tapers to a point). The leaves are 2-4 inches long and one-and-one-fourth inches wide. The bark of hackberries is light gray and smooth, with prominent corky, somewhat warty, ridges on older trees. Hackberry fruit are brownish-red, about a third-of-an-inch in diameter. This common native tree can grow 60 to 80 feet high with a trunk 2 to 3 feet in diameter. Hackberry trees are very prolific seed producers. Inspect your backyard for weedy hackberry saplings than can come up anywhere near the hackberry tree. Cut them down to help reduce the number of woolly aphids you have in the future. last_img read more

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Pirate Mama: A Quest for Badassery

first_imgSome people have credited us with making up the word badassery as part of the Pirate Mama Kickstarter. Unfortunately, it’s not mine to claim. Urban Dictionary defines badassery as “engaging in seemingly impossibly success in a manner that renders all onlookers completely awestruck.”I disagree with that definition. While I haven’t coined the word, I’m aiming to redefine it. To me, badassery has nothing to do what anyone else thinks. Badassery is the magic of a rainbow when nobody else is around to see it. It’s rediscovering wonder. It’s about pursuing the impossible when the crowds have all gone home. It’s about tapping into your knowledge and experience to reach beyond your believed limits. Badassery is becoming the truest expression of yourself.Screen Shot 2015-11-02 at 10.42.10 AMBadassery requires us to pursue the things that make our hearts sing, our feet dance, and our eyes shine. It’s about doing what makes us feel most alive. It’s not enough to keep doing the same things over again. We must continue to grow, to explore, to take risks and challenge ourselves.It’s tempting to measure our badassery by an external yardstick – the number of miles we run, the class of rapids we paddle, or the difficulty of the route we climb. Worse yet, we compare our efforts to the successes of others.  We are not the trails we run or the rivers we paddle or the rocks we climb.  We are people.True badassery is all about reaching and failing and having the courage to reach again. Badassery is the graceful attitude we muster up even on the worst of days. It’s about letting go of control and plans so that the journey unfurls, having faith in our ability to adjust as we go.Screen Shot 2015-11-02 at 10.42.28 AMOne of the highlights from the Pirate Mama Kickstarter has been seeing our t-shirts come together. Two weeks after we launched, a graphic artist friend offered to design something for the project. We thought a t-shirt would be a great addition to the rewards we offered backers, but had no idea what to print on it.I reread the comments our backers wrote about the project and one particularly resonated with me. A friend who shared the project on social media encouraged others to help me fulfill my dream of  “matriarchal badassery.”I loved how he phrased it but realized not everybody wanted to wear that logo around town.There are so many aspects of our project. As a single mom I’m redefining my own notions about what that means by fulfilling a lifelong parenting dream of sailing with my young child.  The project involves collecting water samples to test for microplastics and connecting local kids to their watery backyards.The common thread between is parenting, humanitarian, and environmental goals our striving to be our best selves. Besides I didn’t want to limit our project to mamas or even parents. Everyone is striving to achieve badassery in some aspect of life. Our logo became Badassery and within minutes of posting it on Facebook, another friend sent an email. “If you need some help printing those t-shirts, let me know. I have everything you need right here.”We think our backers our reaching for badassery too. To order your t-shirt, go to our Pirate Mama Kickstarter and select the $35 reward for your choice of a short- or long-sleeved shirt in either blue or charcoal.  The campaign ends this November 4th at 4 pm EST and with it ends you chance to wear one of these comfy t-shirts. Go to Pirate Mama Kickstarter to order yours today!last_img read more

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Honduran Authorities Incinerate 456 Kilos of Cocaine

first_imgBy Dialogo July 06, 2012 On July 4, Honduran authorities incinerated 456 kilos of cocaine recently seized in joint operations with agents of the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA), AFP reporters have confirmed. The burning of the drugs at the Tegucigalpa municipal garbage dump was the responsibility of law-enforcement authorities, the National Directorate for the Fight against Drug Trafficking (DNLCN), and the police. According to the Public Prosecutor’s Office, the cocaine was seized on June 22 in Ahuás, in the department of Gracias a Dios (in eastern Honduras), and on June 13 between Gualaco and San Esteban, in the department of Olancho (in central Honduras), and in the city of Comayagua, in the department of the same name (in west-central Honduras). According to U.S. authorities, approximately 90 percent of the drugs that reach that country’s market circulate through Central American countries, originating in South America, for which reason it offers aid to the region’s Governments for the fight against narcotics trafficking.last_img read more

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Docklands

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Australia sees biggest daily rise in COVID-19 cases in 2 months

first_imgTopics : The restrictions, including forcing restaurants and cafes to offer only takeaway services, shutting schools and halting sports proved successful in slowing the spread of COVID-19.But it was a hammer blow to Australia’s economy, which is heading into its first recession in three decades as the unemployment rate hits a 19-year high of 7.1%.Prime Minister Scott Morrison has called on states to continue easing restrictions, insisting the country’s economy can not remained idled.Morrison ruled out a blanket extension of a A$60 billion ($41.1 billion) wage subsidy scheme beyond its scheduled end in September.”It can’t be sustained forever,” Morrison said, adding that another phase of stimulus at the end of September would be targeted “to the people who need it most”.The Grattan Institute, an independent think tank, said in a report published on Monday the government needs to inject up to A$90 billion more in stimulus, including extending its wage subsidy programThat stimulus was needed before the annual budget in October to bring the unemployment rate down to about 5% by the middle of 2022, the report said. As cases have mounted, Victoria has embarked on a massive testing regime and the state’s chief health officer said the state is considering reimposing social distancing restrictions.”Changing the law is something we have to consider because we have to do whatever is required to turn this around,” Brett Sutton told reporters in Melbourne, referring to questions about localized lockdowns.In May, Victoria – home to more than 6 million people – began lifting restrictions imposed a month earlier to slow the spread of the virus.It has pledged to remove the bulk of restrictions by the end of July.center_img Australia’s second most populous state said on Monday it is considering reimposing social distancing restrictions after the country reported its biggest one-day rise in new coronavirus infections in more than two months.While many states and territories have yet to report their latest numbers, Victoria said it has detected 75 cases in the past 24 hours – enough to make it Australia’s biggest daily outbreak since April 11.The growing figures have stoked fears of a second wave in Australia after several weeks of fewer than 20 new cases a day.last_img read more

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‘Fuming’ David Seaman tells Arsenal how much it will cost to replace Juventus-bound Aaron Ramsey

first_img PLAY Full Screen SPONSORED ‘Fuming’ David Seaman tells Arsenal how much it will cost to replace Juventus-bound Aaron Ramsey More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man CityUnai Emery is desperate to bolster his squad in north London but recent reports suggest he will be handed a transfer kitty of just £45m.Seaman told talkSPORT: ‘I’m still fuming at the fact we’re going to lose Ramsey.‘It gets even more frustrating with the fact they’ve announced Emery only has around £40million to spend in the summer.‘That’s what you’d have to pay to get someone like Ramsey, probably a little bit more. Read More About Connatix V67539 Read More Manchester United captain Harry Maguire 1/1 David Seaman is ‘fuming’ by Ramsey’s exit (Picture: Getty)‘It’s demoralising for me and I’m sure it’s even more demoralising for the fans to hear that and then to see quality players leaving the club.‘It’s even more frustrating the fact that it’s for nothing, that’s why he’s getting so much money at Juventus. I just don’t get it, I don’t know what the forward thinking is.‘The fact that Emery gets one transfer window and he gets told he can only do loan deals, now we’re looking at the end of the season where he only has £40million to spend.’Fellow Arsenal legend Ian Wright has also reacted with disappointment after it was confirmed Ramsey was set to join Serie A giants Juventus.He said: ‘Ramsey has been magnificent for Arsenal. He’s one of those players who never hid, always showed for the ball. He always tried to make things happen.‘We’re losing a great player and that’s a shame.’Ramsey, meanwhile, sent a message to the ‘extremely loyal and supportive’ Arsenal fans after signing a pre-contract agreement with Juventus.‘You welcomed me as a teenager and have been there for me through all the highs and lows I’ve encountered during my time at the club,’ the Welsh star said.More: FootballBruno Fernandes responds to Man Utd bust-up rumours with Ole Gunnar SolskjaerNew Manchester United signing Facundo Pellistri responds to Edinson Cavani praiseArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira moves‘It is with a heavy heart that I leave after 11 incredible years in north London.‘Thank you. I will continue to give the team 100% and hope to finish the season strongly, before heading on to my next chapter in Turin.’Arsenal, who are currently fifth in the Premier League, face BATE Borisov in the Europa League on Thursday night.MORE: Liverpool pair urge RB Leipzig striker Timo Werner to join the club in the summer by Metro Advertisement Read More Video Settings Aaron Ramsey will leave Arsenal to join Juventus this summer (Picture: Getty)David Seaman has warned Arsenal they will need to spend their entire summer transfer budget to sign an adequate replacement for Aaron Ramsey.Wales international Ramsey will bring his 11-year stint at the Emirates to an end this summer after it was announced he would join Juventus in a deal worth around £400,000-a-week.The 28-year-old has been a key player for the Gunners over the last decade, playing over 350 games in all competitions and helping the club win three FA Cup titles.Legendary goalkeeper Seaman is ‘fuming’ by Ramsey’s imminent departure and says it will cost his former club at least £40million to sign an adequate replacement in the summer.AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENT Visit Advertiser website GO TO PAGE Skip 1 min. story Metro Sport ReporterWednesday 13 Feb 2019 10:39 amShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link240Shares Comment Top articles Read More Rio Ferdinand tells Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop struggling / Skip Ad Read More Coming Next Advertisementlast_img read more

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